Lublin renaissance - sacral architecture
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Lublin renaissance - sacral architecture

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Lublin renaissance - sacral architecture

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Lublin renaissance - sacral architecture

The phenomenon of the so-called “Lublin Renaissance”, present in the former architecture of the today’s Lublin region, combining elements of a Gothic structure with Renaissance-Mannerist architectural décor, is best visible in sacred buildings – mainly churches. Despite changes that affected them, they constitute best preserved and in terms of style – considerably consistent set of buildings, even if diversified typologically, despite the fact that the churches were most probably created by a dozen stonemasons of Lublin, including several identified by name, such as Paweł Negroni, Piotr Durie, Jakub Balin, Piotr Traversi, Jakub Tremanzel, and Jan Cangerle – Italians coming mainly from the area of Lago di Como (Comacine masters).

Probably the most famous creator of the largest number of built and rebuilt objects was Jan Wolff, a stonemason of German origin from Turobin and Zamość, the architect of the churches in Turobin, Uchanie, Radzyń, and the Basilian Orthodox church in Zamość, as well as the creator of interior décors of a couple of churches of Lublin, e.g. in the church of Our Lady Victorious (chancel), the Carmelite Discalced church, and the parish church in Czemierniki. For a substantial part of provincial churches, it was impossible to determine their architects, as in the case of the churches in Gołąb and Łęczna, sometimes associated with Wolff. Most of the churches included to this style came into being as a result of the reconstruction or expansion of older Gothic churches, including the parish church in Kazimierz Dolny or the Bernardine church in Lublin. For that reason, most of them are relatively small, with one nave and without towers. The largest and at the same time the oldest of the surviving churches in the area is the three-nave basilica monastery church of Bernardine brothers, which underwent a full-scale conversion after a fire – under the direction of Balin in the early 17th century. Visible remnants of the Gothic structure of the walls are narrowed chancel, windows elongated in shape (sometimes with preserved pointed arches) and external buttresses. Other churches feature a single-nave layout, sometimes enlarged by pairs of “transept” chapels (Wolff’s churches).

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