Pagan sacred mountains of Łysiec Region
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl
Pagan sacred mountains of Łysiec Region

collection

Pagan sacred mountains of Łysiec Region

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Pagan sacred mountains of Łysiec Region

In beliefs of ancient Slavs, mountains occupied a very special place. They aroused fear and admiration, were identified with homes of gods, and were a suitable place of meeting with them. Strange atmospheric phenomena, often occurring in this area, reinforced this belief. Hence many of often ambiguous traces of human activity discovered on the summits of the mountains dominating in the surrounding landscape were considered to be remnants of past places of worship, magical practices and rituals.

On the sites considered sacred pagan mountains, traces of human presence are typically almost imperceptible. This is due to the specific use of these sites – the separation of the sacrum zone (which usually remained empty) and only temporary presence of some people at the site, e.g. priests or small groups participating in the rituals. Therefore, these places feature no traces of permanent buildings: temples, residential, or utility structures. On the other hand, stone structures can be found there - symbolic ramparts, circles, altars, or gates, and remains of rites (bonfire places and few pieces of broken vessels that occur evenly throughout the whole area). These sanctuaries originate from the tribal period (8th to 10th century), although the one on Łysiec was probably used longer. It is the most known of them, and referred to in many legends. In the 2nd quarter of the 12th century, a monastery was created here, from the 14th century called Holy Cross. It is a good example of the Church taking over traditions of ancient pagan sanctuaries.

Apart from the centre of worship on Łysiec, the collection includes former sanctuaries on the neighbouring mountains: Góra Dobrzeszowska, Góra “Zamczysko” in Widełki, and Góra Grodowa in Tumlin.

Sites from that collection