Churches of the Polish Spisz Region
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl
Churches of the Polish Spisz Region

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Churches of the Polish Spisz Region

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Churches of the Polish Spisz Region

Within the borders of the Republic of Poland, a little less than half of Zamagurie, commonly called Polish Spisz, is located. Situated in the picturesque area at the foot of the Tatra Mountains, it is a region of individual ethnographic features and an interesting history. This very area, covering 13 villages, with an overwhelming majority of Polish population, was granted to Poland in 1920 by decision of the Council of Ambassadors. The rest of the region was incorporated into Czechoslovakia. Until World War I, the whole territory belonged to Hungary, and it was included into the court district of Stara Wieś. The area is approx. 200 km2 in size and is inhabited by a few thousand people. It is a very interesting region both in landscape as well as cultural terms.

Apart from the famous castle in Niedzica, a number of churches can be found in the villages of Spisz. Undoubtedly the oldest preserved works of human hands in Spisz are remains of medieval villages. Particularly interesting and legible examples have survived, e.g. Nowa Biała, Krempachy, and Frydman. The oldest monuments of architecture in the Polish Spisz are sacred buildings. They include Gothic churches in Frydman, Niedzica, Kacwin, Krempachy, and Łapsze Niżne. They all features simple single-nave layouts, with chancels covered with cross-rib vaults. The architecture of late-Baroque churches in Nowa Biała and Łapsze Wyżne is modest and reproduces the type of a single-nave building common in that period in the empire, featuring a tower topped with a bulbous tented roof and distinctive curved cornices circumscribing clock dials. Two wooden churches – in Trybsz and Jurgów, have also survived. According to local tradition, the church in Trybsz was built in 1568. The small building was erected anew or thoroughly renovated in the second quarter of the 17th century. The church in Jurgów comes from the years 1670–1675.

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