Chapel of St Roch, Iwanowice Włościańskie
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

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18th-century chapel dedicated to St Roch. This dedication is relatively rare. In Poland, he was worshipped already in the 15th century, along with St Sebastian, and became a patron protecting against epidemic. He also looked after health of domestic animals, particularly cattle.

History

The chapel was built in the end of the 18th century, on a hill, by a spring considered miraculous by local residents. There are as many as 7 chapels in the parish, located in a hilly landscape, among other things a chapel of Our Lady of Consolation (19th century) and a figure of St John of Nepomuk (approx. 1800). Water from the spring of St Roch is respected even today and given to ill cattle. In August, a Mass is celebrated to which the faithful come with their animals.

Description

The building is made of brick, covered with a tented roof, and formed as a classical portico. It features a pseudo-tympanum covered with weatherboarding. The pediment rests on four white-painted columns with gilded capitals. The patron saint is presented traditionally, with a pastoral stick and a dog.

The monument is accessible without limitations.

compiled by Roman Marcinek, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Krakow, 20-03-2015.

Bibliography

  • Chrzanowski T., M. Kornecki, Sztuka ziemi krakowskiej, Kraków 1982.
  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. I, Województwo krakowskie, pod red. J. Szablowskiego, Warszawa 1953, s. 524-525.
  • Łoziński J. Z., A. Miłobędzki, Atlas zabytków architektury w Polsce, Warszawa 1967, s. 116.

General information

  • Type: chapel
  • Chronology: koniec XVIII wieku
  • Form of protection: register of monuments
  • Address: Iwanowice Włościańskie
  • Location: Voivodeship małopolskie, district krakowski, commune Iwanowice
  • Source: National Heritage Board of Poland

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