Octogonal cruciform churches by P.A.Fontana
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl
Octogonal cruciform churches by P.A.Fontana

collection

Octogonal cruciform churches by P.A.Fontana

3

Octogonal cruciform churches by P.A.Fontana

A relatively small group of four (formerly five) Late Baroque churches, called “Lubartów churches” or “Fontana churches” after the name of their creator, Italian architect Paolo Antonio Fontana – constitute an important contribution to the development of architecture in the area of today’s Lublin region, as well as Polish architecture of the 18th century. The unique characteristics of these churches consist in the consistent use, by one architect, of a main, considerably sophisticated church plan and a spatial layout resulting from it, along with a body in a couple of development versions, designed within a period of approx. 20 years (1733–1753), which is a fairly rare phenomenon in the Polish sacred architecture.

The three main churches of this group: parish church in Lubartów, church of Pauline Fathers in Włodawa, and parish church in Chełm operated by Piarists monks, were erected on a composite, central, elongated plan with a nave shaped as an elongated octagon, with four great arcades on perpendicular axes, opening to an elongated extended chancel and a short span of the choir, and two analogical spans of “transept” chapels. The layout is supplemented by two pairs of smaller chapels on diagonal axes, adjoining the nave with smaller arcades and passageways to side chapels, and a porch under the choir, forming in that way a gallery. The nave is covered with a tripartite cupola ceiling which from the outside forms a quasi-cupola roof topped with a lantern motif (Włodawa), or its simplified, octagonal version with a short ridge in the middle (in Lubartów without a lantern, which was not rebuilt after a roof fire). The body of the churches is complemented by pairs of towers of different height and setting in relation to the body. An exception in the group is the smallest church, the church of Carmelites in Lublin, with a towerless front façade and a plan without the pair of “transept” chapels (there is a tower above the entrance to the monastery). The interior architecture of the churches is closely integrated with their fittings and architectural, sculpture, and painting décor.

Sites from that collection