The oldest defensive castles in Central Poland
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl
The oldest defensive castles in Central Poland

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The oldest defensive castles in Central Poland

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The oldest defensive castles in Central Poland

The oldest castles erected in Central Poland are predominantly brick constructions built on a foundation of erratic stone, on a mound surrounded by a moat. The only exception being the castle in Inowłódz, which is built entirely of stone. The castles are not uniform structures. Castle complexes founded between 14th and 16th century accrued, expanded within the defensive walls according to changing architectural trends and military conventions.

The oldest of them were founded by King Casimir the Great and the bishops of Gniezno. Among them are the castle in Bolesławiec (ca. 1340), credited to royal foundation, the reconstructed castle in Łęczyca (erected probably ca. 1352) as well as structures in Inowłódz and Rawa Mazowiecka (the latter credited to the foundation by Siemowit IV), both preserved as permanent ruins and partially exploited. The collection includes also the castle founded by archbishop Jarosław Bogoria Skotnicki, erected in the middle of 14th century in Uniejów — currently rebuilt and serving as a hotel. One of the best preserved castles in the region is the one erected by the Oporowski family, de armis Sulima, in Oporów (ca. 1418).  Also privately founded is the 16th-century castle in Besiekiery, preserved as ruins.

Particular attention should be paid to the newest structure in the collection – referred to as a "castle-shaped tower". It was founded by Zygmunt the Old in Piotrków Trybunalski and served as a Sejm residence of the last of the Jagiellons.

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