The romanesque architecture route in Kuyavia
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl
The romanesque architecture route in Kuyavia

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The romanesque architecture route in Kuyavia

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The romanesque architecture route in Kuyavia

Apart from the Greater Poland, Cuiavia is probably the second region most strongly associated in historical and artistic terms with the beginnings of the Polish state. It is here, on a relatively small area, where the most outstanding works of Romanesque architecture in Poland are located. The Cuiavian Romanesque route leads from Mogilno through Strzelno, Kruszwica, to Inowrocław.

Our knowledge of construction and art of the times of the first Piasts and the feudal fragmentation of Poland would be much poorer if not for the discovery of the famous columns and tympanums in Strzelno, heads from the walls of the church in Inowrocław, or classical architecture of the collegiate church in Kruszwica. It is another reason for which these monuments deserve special attention and protection.

Out of Romanesque monuments of Cuiavia, the Benedictine monastery in Mogilno, founded by Casimir I the Restorer in the second half of the 11th century is the oldest. Under the floor of the monastery church, there is an excellently preserved Romanesque crypt. The church of the Holy Trinity and Blessed Virgin Mary in Strzelno in turn, consecrated in 1216, although it was converted to a significant degree in later centuries, stands out for its great sculpted decoration of tympanums, but above all the famous columns with personifications of 18 of the virtues and 18 vices – a monument unique not only in Poland, but also on the European scale. Just next to it, there is an equally unique monument – rotunda of St. Procopius from the 12th century. The Romanesque church in Kościelec, originating from the turn of the 13th century, is somewhat less known. The Romanesque features of the collegiate church of St. Peter and Paul in Kruszwica from the 12th century, and the church of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Inowrocław were restored at a later time, owing to which their current form corresponds to the nature of Romanesque architecture better.

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