Palace and park complex, Czesławice
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Palace and park complex

Czesławice

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The monument located near Nałęczów is a relatively well preserved palace and park complex with significant landscape qualities, with an interesting neoclassical palace built by Wacław Wernicki, an industrialist from Warsaw, in the 1980s according to the design of architect Leandro Jan Marconi. The palace is surrounded by a landscape part designed by Walerian Kronenberg, an entrance gate and several utility buildings, including the coach house.

History

The palace and part complex in Czesławice near Nałęczów was founded on a site previously occupied by the manor complex dating back to the 16th century. In 1886, the estates were purchased by Wacław Wernicki, an industrialist from Warsaw, acting as a shareholder in a company which intended to reactivate the resort, who erected his residence near the old manor house. The residence was probably designed by architect Leandro Jan Marconi from Warsaw. The site was surrounded by a landscape part designed by Walerian Kronenberg. The number of farm buildings was increased by new utility buildings. After the death of the wife of Wacław Wernicki — Elżbieta Lilpop (buried in the cemetery in Nałęczów) — ownership of the estates in Czesławice passed to their daughter Zofia, the wife of Bronisław Lilpop. The palace was then partly extended and converted inside. The alterations including adding a drawing room surrounded by terraces to the garden facade, extending the southern connector, building an entrance gate to the park from the south. After 1920, the ownership of the estates was acquired by Tomasz Milowicz, who extended the section including utility buildings. After the Second World War the ownership of the estates were nationalised and passed to the Department of Experiments of the Higher School of Agriculture [pol. Zakład Doświadczalny Wyższej Szkoły Rolniczej], for which the palace was partly converted (including extending connectors and wings, replacing ceilings and roofs, introducing new divisions of the interior). During unfortunate renovations the original decor of the palace was partly destroyed; in the following years the park was seriously damaged. After 2001, the new private owners of the complex started complete revalorisation of the palace and the park.

Description

The palace and park complex is located to the south of rural buildings, which are situated away from the complex at the intersection of the roads to Nałęczów and Sadurek, and is limited by a river to the east. The palace surrounded by the park, with an entrance gate to the south, is located in the centre of the complex. A complex of farm buildings is sited to the north-west of the palace. The neoclassical palace with the front facade facing the west, is built on an extensive, multi-section floor plan. The main two-storey body is rectangular in shape and extended with a pronounced garden annex (wing) built somewhat later. The tripartite interior layout includes a hall terminating in a semi-circular shape on the axis, originally with two large rooms from the garden (secondarily divided) on the left and right side and a staircase in the front suite of rooms. Single-storey connectors (secondary extension to the building) leading to the pavilions positioned perpendicularly, originally also single-storey, later extended, were added to the side walls of the body of the building. The pavilions are rectangular in shape, closed with a semi-circular ‘small apses’ on the front side and from the side of the garden. Originally they formed a single space, they were divided secondarily. The palace is built of brick and plastered. The space between the storeys and in the basements features Klein’s reinforced concrete floors and ceilings, respectively. The roof truss is made of wood and modern. The sections of the building are covered with hip roofs or gable roofs and made of sheet metal. The front facade of the main body is two-storey, has three axes, with an insignificant pseudo-avant-corps in the centre, with an entrance preceded by a strongly projecting pillar-and-column portico with a forecourt, with a terrace directly above. The avant-corps is crowned with a full spindled attic with vases in the corners Both sides of the main body feature lower (single-storey with a mezzanine floor) three-axial connectors and — slightly higher — the outermost pavilions with three-axial ‘small apses’ divided by pilasters. The building features a pronounced three-axial annex on the rear facade closed off with terraces on three sides: a semi-circular terrace on the eastern facade and rectangular terraces on the left and right side, supported by Tuscan columns. The corners of particular parts of the palace and facades of the connectors are covered with horizontal rustication. Rectangular window openings are framed by auricular surrounds, and crowned with cornices on the ground floor of the main body. The interior has been recently stylishly re-arranged according to the preserved remains of the former decor and fittings (stucco decoration, floors) and iconographic records. The landscape park is harmoniously integrated into the natural landscape of the site, with an oval forecourt, which can be accessed from three alleys. The eastern part of the park features a system of ponds (Czad, Świteź and Fasolka), created using the watercourses, causeways and a bridge. The three-bay gate features an entrance gate in the centre, flanked by a pair of Tuscan columns and two smaller gates on both sides, limited by a pair of Tuscan pillars supporting the entablature. The farm complex with utility buildings, the majority of which were erected in the second half of the 19th century, including a brick coach house surrounding the utility courtyard to the north, built on an elongated tripartite floor plan, with a higher and wider central part and slightly lower and narrower side winds — individual parts are covered with gable roofs made of sheet metal. The coach house was built of brick and plastered. The front facade is accentuated by a triangular peak in the centre, pierced by a number of entrance openings. The corners and the central axis are accentuated by Tuscan pilasters, with a mezzanine frieze under the eaves, with small ‘lying’ windows.

No visitor access to the monument. Private property.

Compiled by Bożena Stanek-Lebioda, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Lublin, 23.09.2014.

 

Bibliography

  • Record sheet, Ogrodzenie w zespole pałacowo-parkowym [Czesławice], prepared by Studziński J., Lublin 1996, Archive of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Warsaw.
  • Record sheet, Pałac w zespole pałacowo-parkowym [Czesławice], prepared by Studziński J., Lublin 1996, Archive of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Warsaw.
  • Record sheet, Powozownia w zespole pałacowo-parkowym [Czesławice], prepared by Studziński J., Lublin 1997, Archive of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Warsaw.
  • Record sheet, Zespół pałacowo-parkowy [Czesławice], prepared by Studziński J., Lublin 1996, Archive of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Warsaw.
  • Landecka H., Pałac w Czesławicach - zabytek przywrócony, „Ochrona Zabytków” 2010, no. 1-4, pp. 17-25.
  • Teodorowicz-Czerepińska J., Pałac w Czesławicach, dokumentacja naukowo-historyczna, Lublin 1986, Archive of the Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Lublin.

General information

  • Type: palace
  • Chronology: 1886
  • Form of protection: register of monuments
  • Address: Czesławice
  • Location: Voivodeship lubelskie, district puławski, commune Nałęczów - obszar wiejski
  • Source: National Heritage Board of Poland

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