W dwa dni przez Polskę
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Damian

W dwa dni przez Polskę

20

two days

pałac, tzw. Nowy Zamek
Bagno

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

4h 55 min

Castle
Baranów Sandomierski

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

6h 56 min

Teutonic castle
Barciany

30 minutes

An example of the Teutonic Order’s military architecture, one of the best-preserved conventual castles, a legible reflection of changes in the functional plan; a prosecutor’s seat.

History

Construction of the brick castle at a wooden fortress site started in 1377. According to the plans of Grand Master Winrich von Kniprode, it was to become the seat of a new commandry. Therefore, the defence structure in Barciany was originally designed as a massive four-wing complex with stately architectural features. In the first stage of construction which took place in 1377-1385, curtain walls were erected and the east wing with basements, as well as an entrance gate. Traces on the façade dating back to that phase testify to further expansion plans. Ca. 1385, the functional plan of the castle was reduced to a prosecutor’s seat. Instead of four wings, two were completed: the stately east wing, and the north wing, lower than initially planned. The other sides of the fortress remained enclosed with curtain walls. The beginning of the 15th century saw the last stage of castle construction when a low roundel was attached to north-east corner, covered with a conical roof. Following the secularisation of the order, the castle became the seat of the administrator of the local estate, and in 1580 Königsberg builder Blausius Berwart constructed a granary attached to the west curtain wall. In the 18th century, a single-storey residential building was erected at the south curtain wall, and a wooden cloister was converted into a wattle-and-daub structure. From the 19th century until 1945, the castle was leased by the Pachino family, together with the landed estate. In 1915, the north wing was destroyed by fire which consumed the original interior decorations. After the war, it became the seat of a state-owned farm. Since 2000, the complex has been owned by a private person and renovation/ conservation work is in progress at the site.

Description

Taking advantage of the natural defensive features, the Barciany Castle was built on a hill, amidst marshes, to the south of a settlement that was to grow into a town. The stronghold was based on a rectangular floor plan sized 55 x 58 m. Brick walls on a stone plinth. Entrance from the east leads to the castle courtyard, once featuring a well in the middle. There are fragments of coloured polychromes preserved on a blind window to the right of the barrel-vaulted gate passage. East wing - the oldest and most stately one, with basements and a gate passage, covered with a high gable roof, and topped with two different ornamented round stepped gables. The most prominent castle interior was a high chapel with five windows, originally of pointed-arch design. Abutting on the chapel was a chapter house which later served as refectory. The top storeys of both wings accommodated single-space storage/defence rooms with rows of small windows/embrasures. The ground-floor and basement rooms covered with massive groin vaults served utility and storage functions. On the outer side, the east wing is supported by massive buttresses. The lower north wing without a basement served utility and residential purposes. Its west wall is topped with an ornamental gable, the finest one in the entire complex: divided by pinnacles featuring plastered panels, decorated with pointed-arch niches with circular openings. In the early mod period, the interior of the low roundel was reconstructed and the cupola ceiling was ornamented with stucco work. A wooden porch was added to the south façade of the east wing, and a terrace was built on top of the plinth of a tower which never saw completion.

The structure can be viewed from the outside.

Compiled by Adam Mackiewicz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Olsztyn, 7.12.2014.

Bibliography

  • Czubiel L., Zamki Warmii i Mazur, Olsztyn 1986, s. 1-4.
  • Jackiewicz-Garniec M, Garniec M., Zamki państwa krzyżackiego w dawnych Prusach. Powiśle, Górne Prusy, Warmia, Mazury, Olsztyn 2006, s. 64 - 74.
  • Kajzer L., Kołodziejski S., Salm J. Leksykon zamków w Polsce, Warszawa 2001, s. 83-84.
  • Torbus T., Zamki konwentualne państwa krzyżackiego w Prusach, Gdańsk 2014, s. 264-269.

transport time to the next site

1h 11 min

zamek biskupów warmińskich
Barczewo

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

5h 38 min

zamek, ob. mleczarnia
Bełżyce

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

5h 43 min

Former castle of the Teutonic Order subsequently converted into a church, currently serving as the filial church of St John the Baptist
Bezławki

30 minutes

A small Gothic castle built by the Teutonic Order which, despite subsequent modifications, remains an example of a well-preserved Teutonic chamberlain’s castle.

History

The village of Bezławki was chartered in 1371. The castle was built after 1377, which is proven by dendrochronological research of the beams preserved in the structure of the walls. The castle was built as the seat of the Teutonic chamberlain (Kammerämter). The main castle building was covered with a gable roof and was adorned with stepped gables; in addition, defensive walls were also erected around a quadrangular courtyard, with fortified half towers with open back sections and an entrance gate positioned by the gable wall (the north-eastern wall) of the castle. In 1402, the castle became the seat of Świdrygiełło, brother of Jagiełło, who allied himself temporarily with the Teutonic Order; as a result, minor adaptation works were carried out in the castle (Świdrygiełło left the castle in 1404). During the 16th century, the castle was transformed into a church, which most likely took place in 1583; the church served as a Protestant temple from the very beginning. In connection with its new function, the interior partition walls were demolished, the window and door openings were relocated (with new windows and a portal in the south-western side of the structure) and a sacristy was added to the north-eastern section of the church, the gable of which was completely redesigned. The gate leading into the courtyard was moved to the north-eastern wall, the courtyard itself taking on the role of a cemetery. In 1726-1730, a bell tower was erected ahead of the wall which incorporated a portal; much of the tower’s structure was half-timbered. Other additions made during this period included a new porch adjoining the longer wall of the building as well as an additional cemetery entrance from the south-east. In 1884, the interior received a new, wooden barrel vault, while the facades were covered with plaster. After World War II, the church remained in hands of the Evangelical commune until the 1970s; after its liquidation, it was abandoned and both the church and the cemetery gradually fell into disrepair. Following its handover to the Roman Catholic church, it was renovated in years 1985-1989. The church currently serves as a filial church of the parish of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Wilkowo. In 2008, renovation and maintenance of the tower commenced; this period was also the beginning of archaeological and inter-disciplinary research connected with the castle.

Description

The church – which started its life as a castle – is situated on a pronounced, isolated hill in the western part of the village (on the southern side of the road leading from Święta Lipka to Wilkowo). The edifice was built on a rectangular floor plan on the south-west – north-east axis, with the former courtyard adjoining the building from the south-eastern side (the body of the building also forms part of the fortifications). A tower, built on a square plan, is located in the south-western part of the church; the sacristy adjoins the opposite end of the church and may incorporate the walls of the former foregate. A porch containing the entrance to the church is positioned on the axis of the longer wall and faces the current cemetery yard. The body of the church is a compact, cuboid structure topped with gable roofs above the main section and the annexes; the tower, taller than the nave of the church, features a pyramid-shaped roof. The current chancel wall and porch are crowned with stepped gables adorned with pinnacles. The walls of the castle made of brick and stone, with split stones used for the lower sections of the walls and facing brick in the upper parts, covered with the remains of plasterwork. The ground floor of the tower is made of stone and brick, while the upper storeys feature a post-and-beam structure; the walls of the tower are covered with plaster on all levels. The roof truss and the interior of the tower are made of wood. The roofs are covered with ceramic roof tiles, with only the tower roof being clad with sheet metal. The castle’s facades are adorned with regularly arranged window openings on the first storey and blind windows on the second. Both the blind windows and the window openings are topped with pointed arches and positioned on the axes of the facade in an alternating arrangement. The first-floor level of the facade incorporating the entrance features additional, smaller blind windows topped with basket-handle arches, including one dual blind window above the roof ridge of the porch. Small windows topped with segmental arches are positioned beneath the eaves. The gable above the chancel follows a seven-axis design and is partitioned by pointed-arch blind windows; the low, broad pinnacles crowning the gable are positioned flush with the surface of the wall, their top sections featuring a flat horizontal strip of plaster between two brick cornices, each pinnacle being topped with a finial in the shape of a semi-circular or triangular pediment, arranged in an alternating pattern. One of the triangular finials also features simplified volute-shaped scrolls which form an extension of the cornice. The gable above the sacristy is similar in design, albeit without blind windows. The interior follows an open-space layout with plastered and painted walls, featuring a false wooden barrel vault with a slightly flattened cross-section. The walls surrounding the former courtyard are made of split stone, and are in a poor state of repair. In the north-eastern section near the church there is a brick gate topped with a basket-handle arch and adorned with a stepped gable with pinnacles. The gablet above the gate features shallow recesses (blind windows) on both sides, with a partially preserved inscription still visible in the inner recess in the centre.

The church remains in use and is closed outside church service hours. It may be visited upon consultation with the caretaker living in the house near the church.

Compiled by Joanna Piotrowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Olsztyn, 15.09.2014.

 

Bibliography

  • Bezławki. Ocalić od zniszczenia. Wyniki prac interdyscyplinarnych prowadzonych w latach 2008-2011, red. A. Koperkiewicz, Gdańsk 2013 (tam wcześniejsza literatura), w tomie tym szczególnie: W. Brillowski, Analiza funkcjonalna założenia obronnego w Bezławkach, p. 119-135; S. Szczepański, Bezławki i okolice w kontekście osadniczym plemiennej Barcji oraz kętrzyńskiego okręgu prokuratorskiego w średniowieczu, p. 14-31; W. Wółkowski, Architektura zamku w Bezławkach, p. 109-117.
  • Kościół pw. św. Jana Chrzciciela w Bezławkach, password in: Leksykon Kultury Warmii i Mazur (online publication), www.leksykonkultury.ceik.eu, access 15.09.2014

transport time to the next site

6h 22 min

Castle
Będzin

30 minutes

Będzin Castle is part of the Eagle’s Nest Trail, i.e. a group of defensive structures built by Casimir the Great in the middle of the 14th century. Although this Gothic castle was rebuilt several times, it is a priceless example of the late-medieval fortification architecture. In historic, artistic, and scientific terms, the stronghold in Będzin is undeniably a monument unique on the regional scale. It also needs to be emphasised that the history of the monument goes back even further, as the castle was built on an area previously occupied by an early medieval settlement from the 11th-13th century, and the first element of the stone architecture, i.e. the keep tower, was constructed as early as in the middle of the 13th century.

History

Archaeological studies reveal that the castle was located on the ruins of an early medieval settlement dated at the early Piast period, i.e. the 11th-13th century. The oldest stone element is the keep tower, which supposedly comes from the middle of the 13th century. The Gothic castle was only built about a hundred years later, its founder being, according to the chroniclers Jan of Czarnków and Jan Długosz, King Casimir the Great (1310-1370). It is also known that the structure was completed before the middle of the 14th century, as its existence was confirmed in documents starting from 1349. The stronghold was a strategically important component of Casimir’s border defence system of the Kingdom of Poland. The castle was inhabited by Mikołaj Siestrzeniec Kornicz and the Szafraniec, Jarocki, Myszkowski, and Zborowski families. In the second half of the 16th century, the building was uninhabited for a short time and it was slowly falling into decline. Altogether, the object was rebuilt a number of times, e.g. in 1616 (following a fire) and in 1655 (after the Swedish Deluge). In the 18th century, the castle was deserted again and fell into ruin, and it was only rebuilt in 1834 (which was an initiative of the Polish Bank). The building was remodelled in the Neo-Gothic and Romantic style, which reflected the contemporary maintenance tendencies. Starting from 1849, the castle was partially ruined again, and its final form and structure were obtained during the reconstruction in the years 1952-1956. It is worth noting that the village of Będzin was mentioned in written records in 1301, and the royal town was established in 1358.

Description

Będzin Castle is situated in the northern part of the city, on the Castle Hill, being one of the hills of the Silesian Upland, on the left bank of the River Czarna Przemsza. The Gothic structure consists of the so-called actual castle and extensive adjacent facilities; the whole was built of crushed limestone (brick was also used in the reconstruction of 1834). The actual castle has an irregular floor plan and double walls, surrounding the internal courtyard. In the north-east corner of the courtyard, there is a cylindrical keep tower, and in the south part, there is a square tower and a storeyed residential building. The walls are topped with reconstructed battlements and surrounded by a dry moat. The adjacent facilities, enclosed with wall, were located on the west side, and the whole site was connected with the town walls surrounding the town.

The site is accessible all year round. The Zagłębie Museum of Będzin is located inside the castle.

compiled by Michał Bugaj, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Katowice, 14-11-2014.

Bibliography

  • Antoniewicz M., Zamki na Wyżynie Krakowsko-Częstochowskiej, Kielce 1998.
  • Guerquin B., Zamki w Polsce, Warszawa 1984.
  • Rejduch-Samkowa I., Samek J. (red.), Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. VI: Województwo katowickie, z. 9: Powiat myszkowski, Warszawa 1962.
  • Kajzer L., Kołodziejski S., Salm J., Leksykon zamków w Polsce, Warszawa 2007.

transport time to the next site

1h 35 min

Prószkowskis’ Castle
Biała

30 minutes

The castle was in possession of the renowned Prószkowski family, the owners of Prószków, Chrzelice, and Biała. This former aristocratic seat has largely preserved its Renaissance and Baroque character.

History

First mentions of a castellany in Biała date back to the 13th century. The town was under the rule of the Piasts from the Opole-Racibórz family line and the Habsburgs (since 1532). Already in the 16th century, the Prószkowski family received property in Biała as a pledge and became its legal owners in the 17th century (until 1810). One of their first investment was the construction of waterworks serving the residence and local residents. The castle was raised in the 16th century on a slope in the north-east part of the town, close to the city defensive structures, including the wall and moat. In the 17th century (ca. 1640), the Prószkowskis expanded their residence westwards. Further transformations were made in the 18th century (1717?) and the 19th century. In 1856 the municipality took over the castle and converted it to accommodate a junior high school and a teachers’ training college. After WW2, the building house a school and a warehouse in the 1980s. Today, the building is a private property and is not used.

Description

The castle stands in the north-east part of the city; the old defensive wall has survived from the west. The two-storey building, covered with a high gable roof has a T-shaped floor plan. The older, east part from the small courtyard features some blind arcades on the façade. The west wind added later is longer than the east one and topped with a tower with a bulbous cupola with a lantern. The main entrance is in through a columned portico in the west wing. The regularly partitioned façades have preserved their old architectural design: voluted gables on the south and window surrounds. The interior with a single-bay layout are vaulted at the ground level and covered with ceilings on the upper floor. At the gable wall in the south wing of the castle, there is a stone penitential cross.

Currently, the complex is a private property and is not made available to the public.

Compiled by Joanna Szot, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 11-01-2015.

Bibliography

  • Chrząszcz J. (red.), Geschichte der Stadt Zülz in Oberschlesien, Zülz 1926.
  • Lutsch H., Verzeichnis der Kunstdenkmäler der Provinz Schlesien, Bd. 4: Die Kunstdenkmäler des Reg.-Bezirks Oppeln, Tl. 2, Breslau 1894.
  • Pilch J., Leksykon zabytków architektury Górnego Śląska, Warszawa 2008.
  • Zabytki sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, (praca zbiorowa), Warszawa 2006.

transport time to the next site

3h 10 min

zamek, ob. spichlerz
Białowice

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

4h 25 min

zamek, ob. klasztor Zgromadzenia Córek Bożej Miłości
Bielsko-Biała

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

2h 56 min

zamek, ob. dom
Bierutów

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

1h 24 min

zamek
Bobolice

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

3h 1 min

zamek
Bobolice

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

3h 3 min

zamek
Bobowa

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

1h 12 min

Budynek zwany „Zamkiem Żupnym”
Bochnia

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

2h 10 min

Zamek i stare miasto
Bodzentyn

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

4h 56 min

Castle
Bolków

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

3h 19 min

Castle, currently the History Museum
Bielsko-Biała

30 minutes

An example of a military and representative complex typical of the region, combining the artistic influences of the Austrian Empire and the local building traditions. The castle is also valuable from the historical point of view, as it is related to the history of the city and Cieszyn Silesia.

History

In the 13th century, the site was occupied by a wooden watchtower surrounded by an earth rampart and a moat. The purpose of the complex, laid out in the vicinity of a trading settlement situated at the intersection of two trade routes, was to guard a crossing on the River Biała. As the town grew rapidly in the 1st quarter of the 14th century, Bielsko and the watchtower were enclosed with defensive walls. An entrance wicket gate was installed nearby the watchtower and replaced with a fortified tower with a through-passage in the 2nd quarter of the 14th century. In the 2nd half of the 14th century, the process of transforming the watchtower into a castle was initiated in connection with its designation as one of the places of permanent residence of the Cieszyn-Oświęcim Duke Przemysł I. The first step was the construction of a south-east fortified tower of stone and of a representative building being an example of the so-called grand houses, constructed in important Silesian castles starting from the 13 century. Moreover, the watchtower area was separated from the city by means of an additional defensive wall. As Bielsko was designated as a permanent seat of the court of the duke, after 1442, the city was reinforced with another, outer band of defensive walls, and the castle was extended and adapted for representative purposes. At that time, the 14th century entrance fortified tower was incorporated into the castle structure and a tower was constructed in the south-west corner of the courtyard. In the 16th century, the process of extending the complex and adapting it for representative purposes was continued at the cost of its defensive features. Two free-standing, two-storeyed castle wings were constructed on the east and west sides and communicated with the other buildings by means of porches or loggias, and a two-storeyed annex adjoining the south wall, a lower gate, and a roundel were built, among other things. A small garden was established between the walls. Towards the end of the 16th century, due to a burden of debt, the dominions of the Teschen Piast dynasty became part of the State Country of Bielsko, which in 1592 was taken over by counts of the Sunnegh family for the next 150 years. Full-scale modernisation of the castle was carried out then, including the gradual interconnection of particular free-standing elements of the complex by means of decks and loggias and the decoration of the façades with symmetrical dividing lines and optical illusion wall paintings. The process was continued in the 17th century. As part of the castle renovations carried out in the 3rd quarter of the 17th century following the Swedish invasion, the final floor plan of the castle, consisting of four full wings spanned with an inner arcaded porch, was fully shaped. In the mid-18th century, the complex was taken over by the Sułkowski family, who owned it until 1945. In 1787, another series of alterations was initiated and continued at the beginning of the 19th century. Upward extensions were added to the wings up to the height of the second floor, inner corridors were constructed on the courtyard side, and a uniaxial, Baroque garden reaching the River Biała was established. Starting from 1855, the last series of works were carried out, consisting in the unification of the whole complex, modification of the external design, construction of the early-historicist Chapel of St Anne, upward extension of the towers, and the adaptation of the external appearance of the castle to the reshaped surroundings. The works concerned the interior design only to a small degree, the major alteration being the construction of a representative staircase in the west wing. In the 2nd half of the 19th century, works were also carried out in the immediate vicinity of the castle: the square on the south side was redesigned, part of the defensive walls were demolished, trading pavilions were constructed on the side of Chrobrego Square and the gardens. In 1934, the castle gardens were deprived of their function in connection with the subdivision of the city according to a 19th century design of Max Fabiani. In the 1970s, the 19th century trading pavilions were dismantled in connection with the construction of a new road to the east of the castle and new terraced retaining walls were constructed.

Description

The castle is situated along the north-east edge of the hill on which the building of the historic Bielsko are located. The main entrance, preceded with an undeveloped yard, leads to the castle from the south, and the most prominent part of the complex faces the representative Chrobrego Square on the north side. To the west, the complex is bordered by Wzgórze Street, and to the east — by the retaining walls towering over Partyzantów Street. The castle is made of brick and stone and constructed on a quadrangular plan consisting of four wings enclosing an irregular, trapezoid courtyard. The three-storeyed wings, covered with hip roofs, form a compact structure, closed when viewed from outside, decorated with avant-corpses, a fortified tower in the north-east corner, and the dominant rectangular tower in the north-west corner. A small rectangular chapel from the 19th century, surmounted by a quadrangular tower with a tented roof, adjoins the castle on the south-east side. The Neo-Renaissance, multiaxial façades of the castle feature a distinct socle level, a crowning cornice on corbels, and vertical division lines in the form of rusticated double lesenes. The north façade, framed by the octagonal fortified tower and the rectangular tower crowned with decorative battlements, is divided by porte-fenêtre windows at the level of the piano nobile. The windows open to a narrow terrace resting on a rusticated arcaded wall. The interior layout in all wings is enfiladed in nature, with corridors with barrel vaults on the courtyard side. In the south and north wings, there are two gate passages covered with barrel vaults. The south passage is decorated with semicircular-arched niches. In the west wing, there is a representative half-landing staircase on a floor plan in the shape of a rectangle terminating in a semi-circle, decorated with pilasters, a frieze with plant motifs, and cove moulding. In the north wing, on the first floor, there is a small room covered with a Late-Gothic groin-rib vaulting with thin stucco ribs, dating from the 17th century, and the corridor features tripartite windows with stonework decorations from the 15th century. On the same floor in the south wing, there is the so-called music room with Rococo-classical wall and ceiling decorations. In the north and west wings, there are also remains of 17th century optical illusion paintings from the former north wing and south wing facades, made using the grisaille technique and depicting architectural sections with figurative elements, as well as painted interior decorations in the form of door framing and friezes. In the cellars of the north wing, covered with barrel vaults, there is a Gothic pointed-arch portal from the 15th century.

The site is accessible. The castle can be visited during the opening hours of the museum.

compiled by Agnieszka Olczyk, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Katowice, 9-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Bicz-Suknarowska M., Komorowski W., Zamek w Bielsku, [w:] O sztuce Górnego Śląska i przyległych ziem małopolskich, red. E. Chojecka, Katowice 1993, s. 91-136.
  • Chojecka E., Architektura i urbanistyka Bielska-Białek 1855-1939, Katowice 1987.
  • Chorąży B., Zamek w Bielsku: rys historyczny, Bielsko-Biała 2012.
  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, T. VI: Województwo katowickie, z. 2: Powiat bielsko-bialski, red. I. Rejduch-Samkowa, J. Samek.
  • Zabytki Sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, red. S. Brzezicki, C. Nielsen, Warszawa 2006.

transport time to the next site

3h 55 min

Castle
Borysławice Zamkowe

30 minutes

Ruins of one of the castles founded in Greater Poland by the archbishops of Gniezno in the 15th century. The surviving remnants of the structure indicate the successive stages of extension of this fortified building, which makes use of the surrounding terrain - a marshy area making it easier to hinder enemy progress.

History

The castle in Borysławice Zamkowe was erected in the early 15th century (most likely around 1423); it was founded by Wojciech Jastrzębiec, the archbishop of Gniezno. Over the next two hundred years, the subsequent owners of the castle (the Russocki, Gembicki, and Szczawiński families) gradually extended the castle, emphasising its military character. The first extension of the castle took place in the second half of the 15th century, the second one — in the early 16th century, and the last one — at the beginning of the 17th century. The castle was set on fire, conquered, and then abandoned by Swedish forces during the Swedish Deluge in 1656. All that remained of the castle in the 18th century were ruins.

Description

The castle is located by the Rgilówka River, 10 kilometres east of Koło; it is surrounded by marshlands which enhance its defensive values. The only parts of the castle which have survived to this day are the ruins of a residential building, a gatehouse with a foregate, and sections of perimeter walls. Initially, the castle was a brick structure built using the Gothic brickwork pattern (bond) and having a floor plan in the shape of a quadrangle slightly elongated on the north-west / south-east axis; three-storeyed residential buildings adjoined the shorter sides of the quadrangle and curtain walls ran along the longer sides. In the southern part of the castle, there was a polygonal turret and a gatehouse leading to the inner courtyard. During the second half of the 15th century, the structure was enclosed with a lower, embattled wall, also made of brick in Gothic bonding, running at a distance of 7 m away from the buildings. The wall was communicated with the original structure by means of a gorge and an embattled foregate. During the early 17th century, a three-storey tower was erected over the old foregate and a new, buttressed foregate was constructed in front of the tower. During the same period, the two existing residential wings were connected with a new, separate building.

The site is open to visitors.

compiled by Tomasz Łuczak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Poznan, 14-11-2014.

Bibliography

  • Guerquin B., Zamki w Polsce, Warszawa 1974, s. 99-100.
  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. 5: Województwo wielkopolskie, z. 8: Powiat kolski, Warszawa 1968.
  • Olejnik K., Grody i zamki w Wielkopolsce, Poznań 1993, s. 234-236.
  • Łęcki W. (red.), Wielkopolska. Słownik krajoznawczy, Poznań 2002, s. 27-28.

transport time to the next site

2h 36 min

fragmenty murów zamku zakonnego
Bratian

30 minutes

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