Szlakiem gotyckich kościołów żuławskich
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

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Szlakiem gotyckich kościołów żuławskich

12

two days

pomorskie

kościół parafialny pw. św.św. Piotra i Pawła
Trutnowy

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

5 min

ruina kościoła parafialnego
Cedry Wielkie

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

17 min

Parish Church of St James
Niedźwiedzica

30 minutes

It is an example of a Gothic village church typical of Żuławy, with partially preserved interior furnishings and a tower restored in recent times.

History

Niedźwiedzica (German: Baerwalde) is a village in Żuławy characterised by a distinctive layout of streets and squares. It was established Ludolf König, Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, under Kulm law in 1342. Under the foundation charter, the church received four free fiefs. The structure was erected in the 14th century, most probably in 1350-1360 (B. Schmid dates the chancel section to 1342, the nave to 1350-1360, and the gable of the choir gallery to the later 14th c.). The post-visitation report of 1647 indicates that the church was built of brick and had a wooden tower. In 1660, during the second Swedish war, the tower was partially burned; the remaining part was supported by beams. In 1823, the half-timbered wall of the western gable underwent renovation; the roof and three buttresses were repaired; in 1854, further renovation work was carried out since the church walls were penetrated by moisture, the roof truss and supporting beams were rotten, and the wooden structure of the tower was in bad condition. In 1855, the local dyke was damaged and a flood destroyed the tower and part of the eastern gable; In the next year, the local authorities allowed to dismantle the tower. In 1858, a southern vestibule was added and a free-standing wooden bell tower was erected. In the late 19th century, the plinth of the church and arches of the western windows were partially modified; minor repairs were also made to the walls. A new brick tower was built in 1995.

Description

The church and the surrounding graveyard are located in the central part of the village, on the western side of the main road.

The Gothic church (free-standing, non-oriented) was built on the plan of an elongated rectangle, extended by a rectangular sacristy to the west, and the reconstructed square tower to the south (1995). The body of the church is simple, covered with a tall gable roof, sloping down into a mono-pitches roof covering the sacristy; to the north it terminates in a pinnacle, and to the south is a massive three-storey tower with a gable roof. The main body was built of brick laid in Gothic bond; the southern wall is made of brick (formerly half-timbered); the roofs are clad with monk-and-nun roof tiles.

The façades are made of brick (selected sections plastered), enclosed by a high plinth with brick eaves; the openings feature pointed arches. The north (front) façade is symmetrical, supported by diagonal buttresses at the corners; a blind window was positioned on the axis; the five-stepped gable is framed by ten diagonal piers and partitioned horizontally with strips of friezes; the gable features eight low pointed-arch blind windows at the base. The east façade is characterised by a discernible division into the nave and the chancel. The axis of the wall of the nave incorporates a portal flanked by two tall windows. The area above the portal shows traces of the non-existent porch. The wall of the chancel has two axes; the axes are highlighted with buttresses reaching the cornice under the eaves. The west façade of the nave is partitioned by two pilaster strips above the plinth into three parts, complemented with decorative arches with windows.

The building features aisleless interior, beamed and planked ceilings (planked ceiling over the sacristy), and wooden king post truss with queen posts. Most of the fittings of the church were entered into the relevant register of monuments in 1982; today, a large part of the historic structures is missing: Baroque pulpit, Late Gothic statue of Madonna, stalls, fragments of the main and side altars. In 1996, two separate compositions of Gothic wall paintings were discovered on a wall of the chancel.

The structure is open to visitors. Viewing of the building is only possible by arrangement with the parish office in Niedźwiedzica.

compiled by Teofila Lebiedź-Gruda, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 02-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Karta ewidencyjna (tzw. biała karta): Kościół parafialny pw. św. Jakuba, Niedźwiedzica, autor W. Chruszczyńska, 1980, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku.
  • Lubocka M., Kościoły gotyckie na Żuławach (dokumentacja naukowo-historyczna), Elbląg 1976-1979, t. V, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku.
  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919, s. 24-31.
  • Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, bearb. von M. Antoni, München-Berlin 1993., s. 33

transport time to the next site

23 min

Parish Church of St Nicolas, currently Greek Catholic tserkva of St Nicolas
Żelichowo

30 minutes

An example of a rural church, typical of Żuławy, erected in the Gothic period and then redesigned in the 2nd quarter of the 17th century using a timber frame.

History

The name of the village (Thuenhain, in the next centuries Tiegenhagen) and a parish priest were first mentioned back in 1349 in the chartering document of the neighbouring village Tuja. The village of Żelichowo was chartered in 1352, under the law of Chełmno (60 voloks of land, with 4 voloks for the parish priest). The construction of the church dates back to the mid-14th century. The dedication of the church was determined back then as well. In 1574-1629, the church remained in the hands of Protestants. According to inspection reports, between 1637 and 1647, the church was damaged by a flood, which resulted in demolition of part of its walls. They were replaced by a new half-timbered structure, and the flooring was elevated. In 1687, new wooden storeys of the tower were erected, and its medieval ground floor was reinforced and covered with brick. During the next centuries, the tower underwent repeated renovations (last time in 1912). It was demolished in 1945 for strategic reasons. After the war, the church served Catholic and Greek Catholic communities. Since 2002, as tserkva of St Nicholas, it has belonged to a Greek Catholic parish and has constituted an important centre for people of Ukrainian descent who were resettled in Żuławy as part of the “Vistula” campaign. Since 2008, the church has undergone several stages of renovation; now, after repairing the roof and drying and insulating of foundations, the half-timbered walls are being renovated and the windows are being replaced.

Description

The church is oriented and situated on the west side of the road from Nowy Dwór Gdański to Segna, in the Tuga river meander, on the left river bank. By the church, there is a former parish graveyard with single gravestones in its north-eastern part. It is a Gothic and Baroque church, with its eastern part (two bays) being the older one. The church was erected on an elongated rectangular floor plan, with a tower on a square floor plan to the west and annexes of a sacristy and a porch joined together to the south. The structure of the church is non-uniform; the main body is covered with a tall gable roof, the tower is covered with a tripartite gable roof, and the annex is covered with a gable roof, perpendicular to the main roof. The eastern bay of the church is made of brick, while the other parts of the main body walls are frame structures with brick infills. The tower is made of brick. The roof truss, of king post type, is made of wood. The roof of the main body and the annex is clad in pantiles, and the roof of the tower - in roofing paper. The ceiling is wooden, planked, and features a crown moulding. The eastern façade has two axes and a six-axial stepped gable. Apart from pointed-arch windows in three-stepped splayed reveals, there are also blind windows with segmental arches. The area of the gable is embellished with narrow plastered blind windows vaulted with arch segments. On the steps of the gable, there are pier-like pinnacles topped with gable roofs. The southern façade has six axes and two parts. In two axes from the east, there is a brick face and two-stepped buttresses. The other axes feature half-timbered walls. The beams of the timber frame are arranged in a truss, reinforced with raking shores in the western part. In the brick plinth area, there is a row of rocks. The shapes of window openings are varied; in the eastern part they are segment-headed, while the rest of window openings are rectangular. The tower is enclosed with single-stepped buttresses, with a separated plinth area. From the west, there is a wide pointed-arch portal with a stepped splayed window reveal. From the south and the north, there are pointed-arch low blind windows with small rectangular window openings. The interior is aisleless, topped with a Baroque polichrome ceiling with crown mouldings. The fittings, e.g. altars (the main altar and two side altars), the pulpit, the baptismal font, pews for believers and the organ gallery with relics of a pipe organ casing, date back mainly to the 18th century.

Limited access to the historical building. Viewing of the interior is only possible by prior arrangement with the parish office.

compiled by Krystyna Babnis, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 21-09-2015.

Bibliography

  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919.
  • Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, bearb. von M. Antoni, München-Berlin 1993.

transport time to the next site

14 min

Filial Church of St George
Jeziernik

30 minutes

The Church of St George in Jeziernik is one of the oldest sacred buildings in Żuławy.

Historia

The foundation charter for Jeziernik (Schönsee) was issued by Luther von Braunschweig, Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, in 1334 (endowment to the church and the parish priest). The first church most probably with a frame structure was built in the 1330s. In the 3rd quarter of the 14th century, the structure was covered with an additional layer of masonry; the preserved original structural components include the truss of the eastern gable and several eastern jambs of the roof truss. The eastern gable of the church is dated to the mid-15th century, and the brick part of the tower to the late 15th century. The wooden storeys of the tower are dated to 1637. Since 1679, the parish of Jeziernik lost its independence and was incorporated into the neigbouring parish in Ostaszewo. The sacristy was demolished in 1837; the northern wall of the church was renovated in 1860 (destruction caused by a flood); and the tower and dome cladding underwent renovation in the 1880s. During World War 2, the church was not damaged. The altar, Gothic statues and confessional underwent maintenance in the 1990s; the roof of the church and the seventeenth-century pulpit were renovated in 2009.

Description

The church is oriented, surrounded by a graveyard, and situated in the centre of the village, on the eastern part of the main village road. The church tower is the dominant feature in the flat landscape of Żuławy. The Gothic building was erected in stages, on the floor plan of an elongated rectangle with a square tower to the west and a small rectangular porch to the south. The body is framed by buttresses and covered with a gable roof and pinnacle gables to the east; the wooden storey of the tower passes into an octagonal overhanging belfry at the level of the roof ridge; the belfry is surmounted by a tall pyramid dome. The walls are made of brick; the upper storey of the tower and belfry with the dome are built of wood. The interior is covered with beamed ceilings covered with weatherboards; the roof rests on a wooden roof truss and is clad with roof tiles; the tower dome is covered with wood shingles. The western (tower) façade is pierced by a portal topped by a semicircular arch and flanked by narrow windows. The southern façade of the main body has five axes, a porch along the first axis to the west, and windows positioned at a high level and surmounted by basket-handle arches. The façade of the porch features one axis, a straight stepped gable, and is decorated with three circular panels and a strip of a flat plastered frieze (a window topped by a semicircular arch is located in place of the original door opening). The eastern façade has one axis; part of the gable is separated by a frieze strip with artistic diamond-shaped decoration. The gable features rich vertical partition and six axes; the axes of lavishly profiled lesenes incorporate pinnacles surmounted by four gablets and a finial. The aisleless interior opens with a pointed-arch arcade towards the porch below the tower; both rooms are covered with planked ceilings, whereas the porch features the original eighteenth-century wall paintings, including the painting of the Apotheosis of St George. The interior is mostly fitted with seventeenth- and eighteenth-century furnishings, including main altar, pulpit, confessional, gallery with a pipe organ casing. The preserved Gothic fittings include granite baptismal font, wall tabernacle, statue of the Virgin Mary with the Christ Child, and statue of St Anne. The graveyard boasts quite a number of nineteenth-century examples of tombstones, including stone steles and cast iron crucifixes.

Limited access to the monument. Viewing of the church interior is only possible by prior arrangement with the parish office in Ostaszewo.

compiled by Krystyna Babnis, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 23-09-2015.

Bibliography

  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919.
  • Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, bearb. von M. Antoni, München-Berlin 1993.

transport time to the next site

5 min

kościół parafialny pw. św. Elżbiety
Lubieszewo

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

3 min

kościół filialny pw. św. Jakuba
Tuja

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

22 min

Cemetery Church of Saints Simon and Jude the Apostles
Gnojewo

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

24 min

St Barbara’s Parish Church Complex
Krzyżanowo

30 minutes

The monument is an extremely valuable example of a sacred complex typical of the Gothic villages in Żuławy. The well-preserved medieval church complex with a graveyard, surrounded by the original Gothic wall, was part of a dense network of parishes established in Żuławy in the 14th and 15th century.

History

The first mention of the parish in the village of Krzyżanowo (German: Notzendorf) dates back to 1319. The next mention in the foundation charter of 1330 for the nearby village of Stare Pole testifies to the existence of a church in Krzyżanowo.

The church was built probably in two stages: the chancel and sacristy were erected in 1325-1330, while the second stage included the construction of the nave in the late 14th c. or early 15th c. (shronological stratification is not clear and requires architectural research). The graveyard was established along with the construction of the church. The boundaries of the graveyard were marked with a brick wall dating from the same period. The site inspection report of 1636 described the church as a brick structure with a separate wooden tower and a steeple. In 1654, the steeple was at risk of collapse, and in 1669 it was still in bad condition. The free-standing tower was destroyed by fire in 1688; a new one was built close to the west façade of the church in 1735. On 17 January 1818, the tower collapsed, destroying partly the western gable of the church. As early as in the first half of the 19th century, a wooden bell tower was erected outside the western boundary of the graveyard. In 1857, a new porch was built to the south (the former outline of the roof is still discernible on the face of the nave).

The church in Krzyżanowo was always a Catholic church. August Walaschewski was the last pastor in the interwar period. During the Second World War, the church was not damaged and its valuable furnishings from the 17th and 18th century have been preserved to this day.

Description

The church complex is located in the north-eastern part of the historic village of Krzyżanowo, in a flat and slightly elevated area. The graveyard surrounded by a brick wall is built on the floor plan of an irregular polygon; its central part is occupied by the church. The Gothic complex (church, graveyard, and wall) is complemented by a wooden bell tower dating back to the first half of the 19th century. The bell tower is outside the graveyard wall, on the south side of the main gate. The area of the protected complex is not geodetically separated. Results of rough measurements indicate the graveyard covers an area of approx. 0.27 ha.

The topography of the plot occupied by the graveyard has not changed since the Middle Ages. The largest side of the graveyard adjoins a rural road running from the north-east to the south-west. This direction determines the overall arrangement of the complex; consequently, the longer axis of the church featuring a gate and the longer axis of the bell tower are in line with that direction. The former layout of the graveyard and quarters cannot be restored. Only a few graves and tombstones have been preserved along the west part of the wall and in the northern part of the graveyard, including classical stele of 1796, profiled post of 1740, neo-Gothic cast iron crucifixes (1825-1889). Moreover, part of the old-growth trees have survived, including maples along the west boundary, ashes at the southern boundary, and chestnuts in the northern part).

The Gothic church is a free-standing structure, built of brick. Its western inner walls feature a frame structure. It was erected on the plan of a rectangle extended by a narrower rectangular chancel; the chancel is adjoined by a rectangular sacristy to the north. The body of the church is compact. The nave, chancel and sacristy are covered with a common gable roof; the church is adjoined by small porches added later to the south and west. The brick façades are supported by buttresses; most of the windows, blind windows and portals terminate in pointed arches; the eastern gable is symmetrical, stepped, and surmounted by pinnacles and partitioned by narrow blind windows; the western triangular gable was built of demolition brick. The interior features an aisleless layout; the nave is characterised by a lowered ceiling, whose central section rests on wooden pillars; the section between the nave and chancel is surmounted by a pointed rood arch; a wall Gothic cupboard was installed to the south of the altar. The preserved lavish furnishings include the fifteenth-century painting titled “The Scene of the Crucifixion of Christ” on the southern wall, Late Baroque main altar, two Rococo side altars, and sets of statues from the 17th and 18th century.

The wooden bell tower is a post-and-frame structure, covered with a low gable roof. The wooden structure was fitted with three bells: Baroque bell from 1735 and styleless bells from 1855 and the second half of the 19th century.

The structure is open to visitors. Viewing of the building is only possible by arrangement with the parish office.

compiled by Teofila Lebiedź-Gruda, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 26-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Karta ewidencyjna (tzw. biała karta): Krzyżanowo. Kościół parafialny pw. św. Barbary, autor D. Styp-Rekowska, 2008, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku.
  • Lubocka M., Żuławy. Kościoły gotyckie na Żuławach, PKZ 1976-1979, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku, t. III s. 14-20
  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919, s. 233-240.
  • Dehio- Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, bearb. von M. Antoni, München-Berlin 1993., s. 445-446

transport time to the next site

26 min

The parish church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary
Kończewice

30 minutes

An example of a village Gothic church with Baroque interior decor, typical for the Żuławy region.

History

The earliest written mention of Kończewice was made in a document issued by the Grand Master Dietrich von Altenburg in 1338. The very first church that stood in this spot, built on a wooden frame, was probably erected in the second quarter of the 14th century, its dimensions being reflected by the current chancel and middle nave. In the second half of the 14th century, the original structure was replaced with a brick one, with the entire church being extended to accommodate side naves and tower (the east facade dating back to around 1380 and the southern one having been added at a later date). The tower and the western sections of the side naves date back to the 15th century. In 1742, the wooden structure of the tower was subjected to thorough renovation works; the wood shingle roof cladding was restored in 1888. The interior was renovated in years 1903-1904; it was also during that period that the pipe organ was modified (by Bruno Goebel from Königsberg, a pipe organ master); the Baroque organ casing, however, remained unchanged. During World War II, the church suffered no damage. In years 1981-1984, the ceiling and roofs were renovated and efforts were made to combat the rising damp in the walls. In 2002 the roof was repaired and conservation works were performed on the pipe organ, along with the organ casing and tabernacle. In years 2009-2012 renovation works were performed on the interior fittings, including the main altar, the ambo, the choir stalls and the epitaph plaque.

Description

The church is a free-standing building oriented towards the east, located in the centre of the village, on the northern side of the historic road from Tczew to Malbork. The church is surrounded by a cemetery and a group of old trees. The floor plan of this Gothic church reflects the fact that it was built in stages; it is a three-nave church with a discernible chancel, narrower than the nave and rectangular in shape, and a tower with a square base incorporated into the nave structure. A rectangular sacristy is located on the northern side of the presbytery, while a small porch abuts the northern nave. The side naves are extended towards the western wall of the tower. The building features a wide array of embellishments, with decorative gable ends in the east and south as well as the monumental brick tower base which blends into the mass of the building. The shape of the church is dominated by a tall tower with an overhanging octagonal belfry and pyramid-shaped spire. The chancel, sacristy as well as the northern and central nave are covered by a common gable roof, while the southern nave features a separate gable roof positioned perpendicularly to the main roof ridge; the annexes abutting the tower are covered with shed roofs. The building is made of brick; the sections built in the Gothic style feature an alternating brickwork pattern. The gable walls of the northern nave are half-timbered. The upper sections of the tower feature a wooden structure. The roofs are supported by timber roof trusses. The roof of the tower is clad with oak shingles, while ceramic roof tiles are used for the main body of the church and for the chancel. The ceilings are wooden, with a beam structure concealed by wooden boards; a barrel vault made of ceramic brick rises above the sacristy. The church has red brick facades supported by buttresses. The chancel walls are decorated with an arcaded frieze. The windows and portals are mostly topped with pointed arches, the blind windows set into the southern and eastern gable ends and into the underlying facades serving as a form of embellishment. The western wall of the church features retrofitted grave slabs dated 1404 and 1651. The interior is arranged according to a three-nave layout; the naves are separated by pointed arcades resting upon octagonal columns. The presbytery is integrated with the nave to a large extent, the rood arch being entirely absent. The interior fittings mostly date back to the 18th century and include the main altar, the two side altars, the ambo, the epitaph plaque and the pipe organ casing. Other fittings include a granite Gothic baptismal font and stoup, two 16th century bells and two 17th century choir stalls.

Limited access to the historic building. Interior tours available upon prior appointment.

Compiled by Krystyna Babnis, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 24.06.2014.

Bibliography

  • Antoni M. von (compilation), Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, München-Berlin 1993.
  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919.

transport time to the next site

7 min

Parish Church of SS Peter and Paul the Apostles
Mątowy Wielkie

30 minutes

The church is a representative example of the local building tradition, in which the stylistic convention of the Gothic era was filtered through the artistry of the local architects and builders. The brick structure of the church has retained—as a kind of inclusion—the elements of the original frame structure (eastern wall along with the gable and two eastern spans of the southern wall). The form given to the church in the Middle Ages has not changed and is now the most notable example of the sacred architecture of Żuławy, with all the elements of the body being preserved. Saint Dorothea of Montau (1347-1394) is still the most famous resident of the village. She was a hermitess and visionary, patroness of Pomerania and the Elbląg Diocese, and was baptized in the local church on 6 February 1347.

History

The first written mention of Montow dates back to 1321. The foundation charter was issued for the village by Ludolf König, Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, in the 1340s. Given the disappearance of the act, in 1383 the document was reissued. The new version of the charter contained information on the church in Mątowy Wielkie (German: Groß Montau). The first church in Mątowy was built in the first half of the 14th century as a small oriented frame structure. Soon afterwards, part of the original structure was surrounded with a brick wall on the outside, and another part was demolished and completely replace with the wall. The lower sections of the wooden tower were replaced with two brick storeys. The next stage involved the construction of a side nave, arcades between the naves, and sacristy. The whole process of construction of the church was completed shortly after the beginning of the 14th century. During the wars from 1626 to 1629 and in 1740, the church was damaged and repaired. The furnishings from the first half of the 18th century have survived to this day. During World War 2, the structure did not suffer any major damage. In 2012-2013, the church underwent complete renovation financed with the funds from the European Regional Development Fund (façades, roofs, ceilings).

Description

The church is oriented. It is located in the southern part of the village, in the close vicinity of the Vistula river bank. The structure is surrounded by an active graveyard with old-growth trees, and adjoined by a rectory and associated buildings. The Gothic church was built on a rectangular floor plan, has two naves without a separate chancel. To the west, it is adjoined by a massive tower on a square plan. The entire structure is complemented by a square porch to the south and a small rectangular sacristy to the north. The body supported by stepped buttresses is dominated by a massive three-storey tower with an octagonal wooden top storey and a tall pyramid dome. The main body of the church is covered with a tall gable roof characterised by a differing roof slope angle; the porch and sacristy are covered with gable roofs. To the east is the main nave and sacristy terminating in the end walls; the side nave is topped by an additional semi-gable; the south porch also features a finial atop. The main body with both annexes was built of brick features is characterised by a partially preserved wooden frame structure (eastern wall and eastern fragment of the southern wall), wooden ceiling (wooden vaulting over the main nave); the sacristy is topped with a barrel vault; the roof truss is made of wood (king post truss in the western sections); the roofs of the main body are clad with monk-and-nun roof tiles. The two lower storeys of the tower are made of brick; the belfry is wooden structure covered with weatherboards; the octagonal dome is clad with wood shingles. The brick façades of the main body with fairly modest ornamentation (low plinth crowned with a cornice and flat plastered frieze under eaves) are partitioned by pointed-arch window openings and stepped buttresses. The eastern façade features four pointed-arch blind windows; the upper parts of the central blind windows incorporate windows; the gable is stepped, has six axes, and no transverse partitions; vertical partitions are marked with pilaster strips, surmounted by octagonal pinnacle. The façades of the tower are decorated with pointed-arch blind windows on three sides; the southern wall additionally incorporates a blind window with six arcades. The main entrance from the west is framed by a two-stepped pointed-arch portal; the northern entrance is rectangular; and the southern entrance (porch) surmounted by a lowered arch. The two-nave interior, partitioned by three arches of arcades resting on two octagonal pillars, is dominated by the southern nave, which is two times wider and slightly taller than the northern one; both naves are covered with painted wooden ceilings; the sacristy is topped with a barrel vault, whereas the porch below the tower with a flat ceiling. The inner eastern wall and part of the southern wall have retained a discernible post-and-beam structure with brick infills. The interior décor and furnishings date back to the first half of the 18th century: painted ceiling and wall paintings on the vaulting of the sacristy, main altar, two side altars, pulpit, baptistr, confessional, set of pews. The preserved original interior fittings include three painted Gothic wooden sculptures: Madonna and Child, Pietà, Pensive Christ, stone baptismal font, and oak sacramentarium.

Limited access to the monument. Viewing of the interior is only possible by prior arrangement.

compiled by Krystyna Babnis, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 28-08-2015.

Bibliography

  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Städte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die lädlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919.
  • Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmäler West- und Ostpreuβen, bearb. von M. Antoni, München-Berlin 1993.

transport time to the next site

13 min

Parish Church of St Nicholas
Lisewo Malborskie

30 minutes

It is a valuable example of a medieval village church in Żuławy. It is characterised by an unusual form of the eastern gable and the unique brick and wooden structure of the tower featuring the preserved fittings from the 17th and 18th century.

History

The church in Lisewo (German: Liessau) was built around 1350 and was most probably an extension to the chapel mentioned in the foundation charter in 1316. The brick foundation of the tower was built in the late 14th century. The preserved eastern gable most probably dates back to the same period. In the 17th century, the church was heavily damaged. In the records of 1647, it was mentioned as a ruin. In 1669, it was still not used for services. The renovation work involved alterations to the inner part of the western wall of the church. On 18 January 1818, a strong windstorm destroyed the tower dome, which was repaired and lowered in the same year (the date “1818” on the flag crowning the dome). Further construction work took place in 1836 (renovation of the sacristy, roof, tower, and main portal), 1853 (renovation of the eastern gable and roof cladding). In 1883, part of the roof truss was replaced according to a design by construction inspector Loebell from Malbork.

After the war, the renovation in 1974 involved removing oil paint from the ceiling and plaster from the splayed interior window reveals. In 2010, the roof and wooden tower structure were renovated.

The parish was founded in the early 14th century (around 1310?) and refounded on 16 June 1979.

Description

The church with the graveyard is located in the northern part of the village, on the east side of the main rural road from Tczew to Lichnowy. It is a free-standing oriented structure.

The Gothic church was built on a rectangular floor plan, without a separate chancel. The eastern part of the northern wall is adjoined by a rectangular sacristy, while the western wall by a square tower. The body of the church is compact and covered with a tall gable roof, sloping down onto into a mono-pitched roof covering the sacristy. The tower is a distinctive and diversified structure incorporated into the main body.

The church is built of brick laid in Gothic bond, on a stone plinth. The north and east wall of the sacristy are made of machine-made brick laid in cross bond (Venetian bond). The upper storeys of the tower are wooden. The west wall of the nave is a post-and-beam structure covered with an additional layer od masonry on the outside. The roof is clad with Dutch tiles; the tower dome with sheet metal. The roof truss is made of wood (half-open roof truss covered with weatherboards over the main body).

The façades are made of brick (except for the façades of the upper sections of the tower, which are wooden). The walls are crowned with a frieze and supported by stepped buttresses. The windows, blind windows and portals terminate in pointed arches and are mostly feature reveals. The east (gable-end) façade was designed symmetrically: tall, two-stepped gable, with three axes of double blind windows; blind windows on the outermost axes filled in only up to the line of the roof; openwork in the upper sections. The west façade almost entirely occupied the square-shaped tower, is made of brick on the ground floor, features a splayed pointed-arch portal along the axis; the upper storeys are wooden, taper towards the top, and are crowned with an octagonal belfry with a dome surmounted by a spire.

The single-space interior is aisleless. The corners of the porch below the tower contain visible wooden structural posts resting on a stone base.

The preserve lavish furnishings of the church include the Gothic sculpture of the Madonna and Child from the late 15th c., Late-Gothic stained glass window, Baroque sculptures from the main altar from the first half of the 18th c.

The structure is open to visitors. Viewing of the building is only possible by arrangement with the parish office in Lisewo Malborskie.

compiled by Teofila Lebiedź-Gruda, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 09-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Karta ewidencyjna (tzw. biała karta): Kościół parafialny pw. św. Mikołaja. Lisewo, autor J. Gzowski, 1984, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku.
  • Lubocka M., Żuławy. Kościoły gotyckie na Żuławach, PKZ 1976-1979, w zbiorach OT NID w Gdańsku, t. IV s. 9-16
  • Schmid B., Bau-und Kunstdenkmaeler des Kreises Marienburg (Die Staedte Neuteich und Tiegenhof und die laedlichen Ortschaften), Danzig 1919, s. 142-151.
  • Dehio-Handbuch der Kunstdenkmaeler West- und Ostpreussen, bearb. von M. Antoni, Muenchen-Berlin 1993., s. 364

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