Szlak Polichromii Brzeskich
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Joanna Banik

Szlak Polichromii Brzeskich

10

one day

opolskie

Castle of Silesian Piasts
Brzeg

one hour

The seat of Silesian Piasts in Brzeg is one of the most important Renaissance castles of Central and Eastern Europe. Its courtyard, with chamfered corners and with cloisters, is reminiscent of the art of Lombardy, while the sculpture decoration of the entrance gate, depicting the continuity of the Piast dynasty from Piast the Wheelwright, through Mieszko I, to Frederick II of Liegnitz and George William II of Liegnitz, constituting a family monument of the family - is replicated on a smaller scale e.g. in the decoration of the castle in Oleśnica.

History

The first manor house in this place was mentioned already in 1235. It was probably a wooden structure located between two town gates: Wrocławska Gate and Zamkowa Gate, circumscribed by a moat and connected with town fortifications. Subsequent conversions took place under the rule of Bolko I, Bolko II, Louis I the Fair, and the most significant conversion, initiated by Frederick II and continued by his son George II, during which the Gothic fortress was transformed into one of the most magnificent Renaissance residences in this part of Europe.

In 1675, the castle along with the whole duchy was taken over by Austrians. In 1682, it was taken over by the Habsburgs and earmarked for temporary ducal residences. Part of the castle was adapted for office purposes. In 1741, during the shelling of the town, the castle was destroyed, and the surviving remnants of castle buildings after a renovation (chancel of the chapel, ground floor of the eastern wing, and some cloisters, and the front façade of the gate house) were adapted for the purposes of food storage of a Prussian stronghold. In the years 1744-1746, another building in the place of the north-western wing was erected, and in 1801, the south-western wing was destroyed during a fire. After the fire, the castle was reconstructed on the basis of a design by Konrad Kirschstein (the wings were lowered by two storeys and a building was added in the place of the northern curtain wall).

During the 1920s, after the departure of the army, when the castle was taken over by the town authorities, the north-eastern wing was adapted to serve as a museum. The inventory and conservation works undertaken in 1935 were interrupted by war hostilities. After the war, roofs were reconstructed (1947-49), and in the 1960s the surveys and conservation works were resumed. The castle complex and the cloisters were thoroughly reconstructed.

Description

The castle is located in the north-western part of the old town. In its vicinity, there are: church of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, to the south: chapel of St Hedwig, and to the north, a park by the Oder. By the north-eastern and south-eastern wall of the church, within the former fortifications, there are gardens inspired by Italian Renaissance, created in the 1990s in the place of gardens from 16th century which have not survived.

In the 14th century, the castle was a four-wing complex with internal trapezoid yard and a quadrangular “Lviv” tower in the south-western corner. Currently, it is a three-wing complex, enclosed from the north-west by a curtain wall. On the south, there is a gate house, slightly projecting in relation to the front façade, and in the south-western corner there is the Lviv tower, and quadrangular towers constituting ending sections of the north-western and the south-western wings. The individual sides of the castle are built on a rectangular floor plan with a single-bay interior layout. The wings have basements underneath. The eastern and the southern wings have three storeys, and the western one is five-storeyed. All are covered with gable roofs. The gate house was originally topped with a hexagonal belvedere tower. Currently, it is covered with a terrace.

The external façades of the castle are covered with smooth plasterwork with irregularly arranged rectangular window openings in sandstone surrounds. The elaborated decoration of the front façade of the three-storey gate house, created in the years 1550-1554, is a significant architectural accent. The front façade, clad in sandstone and two-axial at the ground floor level, with axes defined by the arcades of the drive-way and the entrance, is three-axial in the upper section, with rectangular window openings. The sculptures and reliefs placed on it show a genealogical history of the Piast dynasty and constitute a monument of their glory.

Internal façades from the yard are articulated with three-storey cloisters, reconstructed on the basis of the preserved fragments. The cloisters at the ground and first storey level are arcaded, and at the second storey level - colonnaded, with external staircases in the corners. Lavish stone decoration of portals (semi-circular in rectangular surrounds) and window surrounds is also worth attention.

Accessible historic building. The castle houses the seat of the Museum of the Silesian Piasts which “as the only institution in Poland preoccupies itself - according to its statute - with the whole issue of the Silesian Piasts and Piast traditions in the historic area of Silesian Land”. zamek.brzeg.pl/

compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 25-05-2016.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. VII: Województwo opolskie, z. 1: Powiat brzeski, red. T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, Warszawa 1961, s. 13-22.
  • Zabytki sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, Warszawa 2006, s. 156-159.
  • T. Torbus, Od Brzegu przez Güstrow do Szwecji. Komaskowie z rodziny Parrów i ich wpływ na rozwój architektury renesansowej w środkowej i północnej Europie [w:] Po obu stronach Bałtyku. Wzajemne relacje między Skandynawią a Europą Środkową, Wrocław 2006
  • M. Jagiełło, W. Brzezowski, Ogrody na Śląsku, t. 1, Wrocław 2014
  • strona internetowa muzeum http://zamek.brzeg.pl/ (25.05.2016 r.)

transport time to the next site

10 min

kościół parafialny pw. św. Jakuba Apostoła
Małujowice

one hour

transport time to the next site

4 min

Holy Trinity Church
Łukowice Brzeskie

30 minutes

The former Evangelical church in Łukowice Brzeskie is a temple boasting Gothic and Renaissance architectural details and fragments of preserved Gothic wall painting.

History

The church in Łukowice Brzeskie was first mentioned in the records in the mid-14th century. With the advent of the Protestantism, the church was taken over by the Evangelicals and supervised by the college in Brzeg. The present church was built in 1581 thanks to the funds donated by Prince Jerzy II Brzeski. A tower was added in the 1st quarter of the 18th century. The interior was renovated in 1900.

The temple was destroyed during WW2 and remained unprotected until the 1960s. In 1974 it was rebuilt and transferred to the Roman Catholic parish in Owczary. Since then, it has served as a filial church.

Description

The church stands in the north part of the village on a rectangular plot. It is surrounded by linden trees and a 16th-century stone fence with three gates (two Renaissance gates with decorative tops and one Baroque gate) and linden trees.

The church is oriented towards the east, built of stone and brick. It is designed on a rectangular floor plan with a quadrilateral tower to the west on the church axis and with a rectangular sacristy to the north. A porch was added on the south side. The smoothly plastered church façades are articulated by stepped buttresses and pointed-arch window openings (high and narrow in the nave, while arranged in two rows in the east façade on the nave axis). The church tower is partitioned with cornices into four levels. On the axis of the lower level, there is an entrance opening topped with a full arch; over it, a wavy section of the cornice. The window openings are terminated in a semicircular shape with surrounds with a keystone. The last tower level is topped with a crowning cornice and covered with a cupola with a lantern.

The church has a double-sloped roof and the roof pane extended over the sacristy. The porch is covered with a gable roof with a ridge line perpendicular to the roof of the temple.

The chancel has a three-sided termination. At the end of the 16th century, the church got a cross-ribbed vault with the ribs running down to the lesenes.

From the original decor, the surviving elements are: the stone portal to the sacristy terminated with a clipped trefoil (1581), stone tombstone of 1635 and late Gothic polychrome in the north wall with the consecration crosses. In addition, the church has a neo-Gothic altar.

Accessible historic building. It is maintained by the parish in Owczary

Compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 12-05-2015.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. VII: Województwo opolskie, z. 1: Powiat brzeski, red. T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, Warszawa 1961, s. 58-59.
  • Lutsch H., Verzeichnis der Kunstdenkmäler der Provinz Schlesien, t. 2: Die Landkreise des Reg. Bezirks Breslau, Breslau 1889, s. 350.
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury - kościół filialny pw. św. Trójcy - poewangelicki w Łukowicach Brzeskich, oprac. Dariusz Stoces, Arch. WUOZ w Opolu, 2008.

transport time to the next site

13 min

Parish church, today Filial Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Krzyżowice

30 minutes

The church in Krzyżowice is among 20 temples in the Brzeg region with preserved wall paintings. It belongs to the Brzeg Polychrome Route created in 1997. The authorship of the paintings is attributed to the Master of Brzeg’s Adoration of the Magi whose name is unknown. The church founders were the representatives of a noble family from Pogorzela (von Pogarell). The present building is the result of expansion of the brick Gothic chancel by a modern nave in the timber-frame structure - this is one of the oldest surviving examples of the application of this technique in the region. Moreover, the church boasts partially preserved works of the modern craftsmanship, a characteristic font, the so-called baptismal angel, Baroque organ by Johann Gottfried Wilhelm Scheffler (the builder of the instruments in the castle church in Brzeg, in nearby Gierszowice and Wrocław - the Church of Divine Providence), or stained-glass windows from the workshop of Adolph Seiler (the maker of numerous stained-glass windows for churches in Lower Silesia).

History

The first mention of the chapel in Krzyżowice surfaces in 1376. In the 2nd half of the 15th century, the Pogarell family initiated the construction of a stone temple. Presumably for economic reasons, the project was stopped after the construction of the chancel, yet it was ready to serve the religious purposes. Its wall paintings made approx. between 1418 and 1428 are attributed to the Master of Brzeg’s Adoration of the Magi. The church became a Protestant temple in 1534. To satisfy the requirements of the new confession, the murals were painted over. The timber-frame nave and tower were funded by Georg von Kittlitz in 1580. The church was renovated many times (in 1695/1696, 1722, 1761, 1777, 1830). On the occasion of the works carried out in 1906-1907, the von Pfeil family commissioned stained-glass windows in the Wrocław studio of the well-known Adolph Seiler.

Until the end of WW2, the church belonged to the Evangelical community. In 1957 it was incorporated into a new parish in Pogorzela as a filial church. In 1963 the chancel paintings hidden for 400 years under the plaster were exposed. Also in the 1960s, the tower was renovated.

Description

The church is located in the west part of the village, on the north side of the road to Obórki. From the north, a somewhat broader timber-frame aisle touches an east-looking, brick, Gothic, buttressed chancel with a sacristy. On the west side, it adjoins a pillar, timbered tower. The double-pitched roofs are shingled. From the south, there is a funeral chapel available from outside.

Inside, there is visible evidence of changes to the construction plans during implementation, e.g. a place for vaulting that was never built. Of the two-storey galleries, initially by the west and north wall of the nave and existing before WW2, only the west ones are left. The upper gallery is somewhat recessed in relation to the bottom one; it houses the organ built by the master of Brzeg J.G.W. Scheffler (1778).

The chancel walls still contain some Gothic wall painting. The painted frames depict: the Adoration of the Magi (north wall), Crucifixion on the Tree of Life with the Martyrdom of Saint Achatius and the Ten Thousand Martyrs, angels and Veraikon at the tabernacle and Vir Dolorum (south wall).

The nave exhibits a wooden frame construction of the walls. The old part of the fittings is fragmented and devoid of the original context: the polychrome pulpit (1614) with the representations of the Evangelists serves as a lectern, and the barrier of its stairs with the images of Sts Peter and Paul hangs on the wall, while the top of the Manierist main altar with the scene of Crucifiction is placed in the hallway over the door. An interesting Baroque wooden font (1724) in the shape of an angel with stretched wings, holding a shell, is placed on the wall. Originally, the Dove of the Holy Spirit was hovering over the angel. The church also houses an octagonal sandstone font (16th c.). The stalls bear the date of 1578. The barriers of galleries and choir may also date from that time. The stained-glass windows in the chancel come from a well-known stained-glass workshop (1907).

The church is in use and is accessible for visitors. It is managed by the Parish of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Pogorzela.

Compiled by Joanna Szot, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 01-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Banik J., Działalność fundacyjna Panów z Pogorzeli na Śląsku w XIII i XIV w. Fundacje kościelne (Monument), Warszawa 2009.
  • Kalbarczyk-Klak E., Szot J., Ewangelickie kościoły szkieletowe w województwie opolskim. Wstęp do badań, [w:] Architektura ryglowa - wspólne dziedzictwo. ANTIKON 2007. VIII Polsko-Niemiecka Konferencja, Szczecin 2008, s. 225-245.
  • Krzyżowice, kościół fil. pw. Wniebowzięcia NMP. Karta ewidencyjna zabytków architektury i budownictwa, oprac. W Żurakowski, mps, Arch. WUOZ w Opolu.
  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. VII: Województwo opolskie, red. T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, z. 1: Powiat brzeski, inwent. T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, M. Zlat, Warszawa 1961.
  • Lutsch H., Verzeichnis der Kunstdenkmäler der Provinz Schlesien, Bd. 2: Die Kunstdenkmäler des Reg.-Bezirks Breslau, Breslau 1889.
  • Ławicka M., Zapomniana pracownia. Wrocławski Instytut Witrażowy Adolpha Seilera (1846-1945), Wrocław 2002.
  • Malarstwo gotyckie w Polsce (Dzieje Sztuki Polskiej, t. II., cz. 3), red. S. Labuda, K. Secomska, Warszawa 2004.
  • Zabytki sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, oprac. zbior., Warszawa 2006.

transport time to the next site

3 min

Evangelical church, currently the Polish Catholic Parish Church of Apostles Peter and Paul
Obórki

30 minutes

The church has an interesting construction history with parts of the previous Gothic church. The ceiling is decorated with signed late Renaissance murals.

History

A church existed on this site as early as in the first half of the 14th century. After the church was taken over in 1534, the Protestants replaced it with a new one. It was built in several essential stages. Presumably in the 16th century, a wooden chancel and a nave, and later a tower (1755, date on the steeple and on one of the components of the structure) were added to the masonry sacristy — a remnant of the Gothic church. The southern porch was added later. Murals on the ceiling, among others, were made at the initiative of Carl Christoph v. Mincowietz u. Schoenfeld during work in 1685. The church served the Protestants until 1945 (including as a separate parish in 1730-1819), when it was taken over the Roman Catholic Church. The Polish Catholic Parish of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary was established there in 1967.

Description

The church is located in the eastern part of the village developed as a linear settlement. It is surrounded by a small cemetery and fenced by a wall which is partly medieval, made of field stone and partly of brick. The present shape of the church is the result of its gradual extension. To the east, the nave featuring a corner-notched log structure adjoins a narrower chancel featuring Upper Lusatian half-timbered framing (the corner-notched log walls covered with pugging adjoin an additional timber-framed structure to the south); on the north side of the chancel there is a sacristy made of brick (brick layout and detail in Gothic style) and plastered. The timber-frame tower (1775) is covered with weatherboards and surmounted by a cupola. The timber-frame porch with a wall structure with brick infill dates from a later period. Gable roofs and tower cupola are clad with wood shingles. In the church there are numerous discernible traces of repairs and alterations. The walls inside the church are whitewashed. Only on the northern wall of the chancel, around the entrance to the sacristy, fragments of ornamental murals have been revealed. The shape of the door opening and the door to the sacristy (with fittings and lock) are Gothic in style. The ceiling over the nave and the chancel is covered with murals: painted frames are filled with floral decoration and braid motif; the ceiling also bears foundation inscriptions (1685). The preserved original fittings and fixtures include a stone baptismal font from the 16th century and a painted wooden pulpit from the third quarter of the 17th century. However, there is no wooden gallery in the southern part of the nave, which was dismantled probably after World War 2.

The church is in use and is open to visitors; it belongs to the Parish of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Obórki.

compiled by Joanna Szot, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 01-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII: Województwo opolskie, issue 1: Powiat brzeski, inventory prepared by T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, M. Zlat, Warsaw 1961.

transport time to the next site

10 min

Church of Our Lady of the Scapular (formerly St Michael’s Church)
Gierszowice

15 minuts

Erected at the beginning of the 14th century, the church in Gierszowice boast an almost intact Gothic body with preserved architectural details.

History

The church in Gierszowice was built in the 3rd quarter of the 13th century, probably founded by the owners of the village, that is, the nobility from Pogorzela. At first, it was dedicated to St Michael. In the 15th century, the temple was surrounded by a stone wall with buttresses, and the nave was decorated with a sgraffito frieze with tracery motifs. From 1534 to 1945, the church remained in the hands of the Protestants; today, it is a filial church of the parish in Krzyżowice. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Baroque furnishings and galleries encircling the chancel were removed. Also, the choir and pews were dismantled.

Description

The church in Gierszowice is in the middle of the village. It is surrounded by a stone wall with buttresses and brick gates on the east, south and north-west.The church is oriented towards the east, made of brick and buttressed; it has a rectangular nave with an integrated quadrilateral tower a porch on the south side. The chancel was built on a rectangular floor plan. It is terminated with a straight wall. The sacristy was added south of it. The nave is slightly broader than the chancel. The nave, chancel and porch roofs are covered with double-pitched roofs; the sacristy is covered with a lean-to roof.

The church façades are not plastered; a narrow strip of sgraffito decoration is preserved under the eaves of the nave and a brick frieze in the chancel. They are articulated by pointed-arch window openings, splayed on both sides. The west façade is divided by buttresses: two external and two internal that transform into lesenes in the upper section. At the top of the tower, in its side façades, there are three window openings, each segment-headed; the middle one is bigger and flanked by the two smaller ones. The east and west façade of the tower are crowned with triangular gables.

The chancel is covered with a cross-ribbed vault, and the nave is covered with a flat ceiling that used to be which was covered with painted decoration templates as in the case of the ceiling of the church in Małujowice. This decoration was damaged or painted over during the works in 1933.

Inside the church (in the porch), there is an early Gothic, stone portal with rich profiling and crockets in the archivolt - now painted over (in an imitation of brickwork).

The monument is open to visitors. The church falls under the parish in Krzyżowice

Compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 02-06-2015 r.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. VII: Województwo opolskie, z. 6: Powiat brzeski, oprac. T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, Warszawa 1961, s. 36-37.
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury- kościół filialny pw. Matki Bożej Szkaplerznej w Gierszowicach, oprac. J. Banik, J. Szot, 2008, Arch. WUOZ w Opolu
  • http://www.dladziedzictwa.org/2012/01/15/gotycki-kosciol-w-gierszowicach/

transport time to the next site

5 min

Filial Church of St. Anthony (formerly St. Lawrence's Church)
Strzelniki

30 minutes

The church features one of the most interesting groups of Gothic wall paintings, part of which was made by fifteenth-century painter unknown by name and called the Master of the Brzeg Adoration of the Magi, author of the murals, among others, in Pogorzela and Krzyżowice.

History

The origin of the church goes back to the late 13th century. In 1534, the church became evangelical (and continued to be evangelical until 1945). In the second half of the 17th century, the nave underwent upward extension, and the roof ridge was lowered. Then, the tower was also extended upwards. From the mid-14th to 16th century, the interior was covered with painted decorations made in four stages: paintings on the lower part of the eastern wall of the chancel around the mid-14th century, paintings on the upper part of that wall in 1418-1428, murals in the nave in the second quarter of the 15th century and in the porch in the first third of the 16th century. In the second half of the 16th century, probably due to the takeover of the church by Protestants, the paintings were covered with plaster. The first fragment was uncovered before 1935. The next ones were revealed and preserved in 1958-1978. After World War 2, the church was included in the parish of St. John the Baptist in Łosiowo. Currently, the church is dedicated to St. Anthony.

Description

The early Gothic church is surrounded by a brick and stone wall. Built of brick and buttressed, it consists of a nave with a porch to the south, separate chancel with a northern sacristy, and tower. It is covered with gable roofs (the façade of the tower bears traces of the nave roof before reconstruction); the tower is surmounted by a cupola with a lantern. The two-bay nave is covered with a ceiling, while the chancel is topped with a ribbed groin vault (on one of the brackets there is a barely discernible mask), and the sacristy features a barrel vault. The door to the sacristy are characterised by decorative fittings and bear the date "1658". Interior: The walls and vault of the chancel are covered with murals. The fragment of the oldest murals is in the chancel, around the tabernacle on the east wall, and is composed of four quarters with scenes: Arma Christi, Jesus in the Temple, Pentecost (?) and Transfiguration (?). On the same wall, there is, among others, a later scene of Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence. Murals on the northern and southern walls depict the Passion and Adoration of the Magi. The ceiling features the repainted symbols of the evangelists. The nave is covered with scenes of Passion stories, Old Testament stories, and lives of saints.

The church is in use and is open to visitors.

compiled by Joanna Szot, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 01-12-2014.

Bibliography

  • Banik J., Działalność fundacyjna Panów z Pogorzeli na Śląsku w XIII i XIV w. Fundacje kościelne (Monument), Warsaw 2009.
  • Architectural monument record sheet, prepared by W. Żurakowski, bd., Archives of the Voivodeship Monuments Protection Office in Opole.
  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII: Województwo opolskie, T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki (eds.), issue 1: Powiat brzeski, inventory prepared by T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, M. Zlat, Warsaw 1961.
  • Lutsch H., Verzeichnis der Kunstdenkmäler der Provinz Schlesien, Bd. 2: Die Kunstdenkmäler des Landkreis Reg.-Bezirks Breslau, Breslau 1889.
  • Malarstwo gotyckie w Polsce (Dzieje Sztuki Polskiej, vol. II., part 3), S. Labuda, K. Secomska (eds.), Warsaw 2004.
  • Zabytki sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, collective work, Warsaw 2006.

transport time to the next site

3 min

kościół parafialny pw. św. Jana Chrzciciela
Łosiów

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

12 min

kościół filialny pw. Matki Boskiej Różańcowej
Kruszyna

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

12 min

Parish Church of St Nicholas
Brzeg

30 minutes

The Church of St Nicholas in Brzeg is one of the largest Gothic temples in the Opole region. Its extremely slender nave (relative to the width) is one of the characteristic features of the Silesian reductive Gothic. In addition, the church boasts a remarkable collection of stone epitaphs from different periods.

History

The first mention of the church is found in a document dated 1279. In 1280 the Jesuit Order took over the administration of the church and decided to build a new temple. A contract for the construction of five bays of the nave body was signed in 1370; in the following years, the aisles were completed and covered with ceilings and a roof. The second stage of the project involved the construction of a new chancel and spanned the years 1383-1389. The main construction works on the Brzeg temple came to a close in 1417. In the following centuries, the north porch was added (1420), also St Anne’s Chapel (1506); the sacristy was raised (1625) and wall paintings were made (mid-15th century). In the 19th century, the temple was extended according to the design by Karl Luedecke. The towers were raised and a gallery was added. In 1524 the church witnessed first Protestant sermons. From that time until 1945, the temple was supervised by the Evangelicals.

The church was heavily shelled in 1945. The upper section of the towers collapsed along with some vaults of the aisles; the fittings burnt in a fire. Because of the damage, the building remained idle for some years. The church was rebuilt in the years 1959-1966 and in 1970 its status of a parish church was restored.

Description

The church is located in the south-west part of the old town in Kościelny Square, surrounded by Zakonnic Street (from the west), Kościelna Street (from the north), Polska Street (from the east) and Długa Street (from the south).

It was built as a three-aisled, east-oriented basilica with a three-sided termination of the chancel and straight closed aisles. From the north, in its central part, a quadrilateral St Anne’s Chapel was added together with some utility rooms and a four-sided porch. From the south side, beginning with the third east bay, a two-level sacristy was added with a knight’s chamber on the upper floor, the chapels of St Barbara and St Catherine with a three-sided termination and a porch. On the west, there are two four-storey towers connected by a gallery.

The church is made of brick, rests on a stone basecourse and is partly supported by buttresses. Its façades are articulated with buttresses and slender window openings, mostly terminated in pointed-arch and with tracery.

The nave is covered with a double-pitched roof with dormers, multi-plane over the chancel. The aisles, porch and St Anne’s Chapel are covered with a lean-to roof. The chapels of St Barbara and St Catherine are covered with gable roofs, multi-plane at the terminating part. The towers are topped with hip roofs.

The west façade is 3-axis with a recessed central axis braced with towers. In the ground floor on the central axis, there is a pointed-arch, two-storey stone portal with decorative tracery. In the upper level, the portal is decorated with retaining arches and pinnacles and culminated in a gable, also braced with pinnacles and decorative crockets. On the axis above the portal, there is a pointed-arch window opening culminating in a triangular gable. The corners of the south tower are buttressed. At the level of the fourth storey, the towers are connected by a gallery resting on the arch. The north and south façade consist of the side façades of the nave rested on a high pedestal, topped with a cornice and partitioned by annexes and of high façades of the nave, articulated by the spacing of the pointed-arch window openings. The east façade is articulated by alternating buttresses and slender window openings.

The nave and chancel are covered with stellar vaulting (original in the chancel, reconstructed in the nave). The aisles are covered with groin and barrel vaults, resting on arches. The chancel and sacristy feature the fragments of a Gothic polychrome with the Tree of Life and Ten Thousand Martyrs. The church fittings mostly perished during a fire in 1945. Only epitaphs have survived on the outer walls. In addition, the church features a Gothic Holy Family triptych, brought from the church in Bąków in 1966.

The monument is available to visitors.

Compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 03-12-2015.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, t. 7: Województwo opolskie, z. 1: Powiat brzeski, Warszawa 1961, s. 4-9.
  • Harasimowicz J., Mors janua vitae, Śląskie epitafia i nagrobki wieku reformacji, Wrocław 1992.
  • Karta ewidencyjna, Kościół parafialny rzymskokatolicki pw. św. Mikołaja w Brzegu, oprac. Jacek Sawiński, 2005, Archiwum Wojewódzkiego Urzędu Ochrony Zabytków w Opolu.

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