Szlak drewnianej architektury sakralnej powiatu strzeleckiego
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Katarzyna Latocha

Szlak drewnianej architektury sakralnej powiatu strzeleckiego

5

several hours

opolskie

Cemetery Church of St. Barbara
Strzelce Opolskie

30 minutes

The cemetery church in Strzelce Opolskie is located near the ruins of a castle, surrounded by a vast landscape park and a prison complex from the 19th century. Five centuries ago, it was built outside the urban space, now it is surrounded by newer building and is a relic of the former layout of the town and its surroundings.

History

The church was first mentioned in 1505; later, its technical condition deteriorated gradually. Around 1683-1690, it was rebuilt on the initiative of Anna Baas with the funds provided by her husband Florian Weiser, Mayor of Strzelce Opolskie in 1668-1677 and his brother Fryderyk, by carpenter Jan Brixi (Brychcy). The west door of the church bore the date "1684", while the rood beam bore the date "1690" and a foundation inscription, which have been obliterated. The church was renovated, among others, in 1720 (the renovation involved the construction of a turret over the nave), 1970, 2010 (vertical support reinforcing the walls). The church belonged to the parish of St. Lawrence in Strzelce Opolskie. The cemetery beside the church features historical gravestones and a grave of Polish airmen who died during the September Campaign of 1939.

Description

The church is located about 650 m north-west of the town hall in Strzelce Opolskie. It is situated at the fork of Opolska Street (national road no. 94) and Gogolińska Street (voivodeship road no. 409), in the eastern triangular part of the cemetery surrounded by a wooden fence with masonry posts.

It is oriented towards the east and was built as a log structure reinforced with clamps at a later time, on a foundation. All roofs are covered with wood shingles.

The church consists of a rectangular chancel closed off on three sides with a rectangular sacristy adjoining it to the north and a wider nave in the shape similar to a square, also closed off on three sides. Entrances to the church are in a straight section of the termination of the nave and in the northern and southern walls, near the choir, opposite each other.

The small body of the church is devoid of a tower and consists of a higher nave and a lower chancel, which are covered with saddle roofs, with three planes over each termination. The one-storey sacristy is topped with a mono-pitched roof. A tall steeple turret covered with a Baroque cupola with a lantern towers over the eastern edge of the nave. The church is surrounded by a canopy running at the level of the lower line of the windows. The window and door openings are topped with arches; in the sacristy they are filled with forged grates.

The interior is covered with a flat ceiling, while the sacristy with a beamed one. The wooden choir is supported by two pillars, can be accessed by stairs from the interior of the nave, and is fitted into the three-sided termination of the nave. The walls and ceilings are in the natural colour of the wood. On the straight rood beam, there is a Baroque crucifix from the late 17th century; the architectural main altar dating from the second half of the 17th century was also design in Baroque style and features gilded pillars and statues, with a brick altar stone.

The church can be viewed from the outside; the interior is open to visitors during services or by arrangement with the parish priest.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 01-01-2014.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII: Województwo opolskie, issue 14: powiat strzelecki, prepared by T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki, p. 43.
  • Lutsch H., Verzeichnis der Kunstdenkmäler der Provinz Schlesien, Bd. 4: Die Kunstdenkmäler des Reg.-Bezirks Oppeln, T. 2, Breslau 1894, p. 278.
  • Nowack A., Die Barbarakirche in Gross Strehlitz, [in:] Oberschlesische Heimat, 1915, Bd.11, pp. 161-165.
  • Zabytki Sztuki w Polsce. Śląsk, S. Brzezicki, Ch. Nielsen (eds.), Warsaw 2006, p.

transport time to the next site

17 min

kościół filialny pw. Nawiedzenia Najświętszej Marii Panny i św. Jadwigi
Szczepanek

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

42 min

Filial Church of St. Mary Magdalene
Zimna Wódka

30 minutes

In the area of the parish of St. Elizabeth of Hungary, there are as many as three wooden churches: parish church in Klucz and filial churches in Zimna Wódka and Olszowa. All were built or completely altered around 1748, have a uniform appearance and structural features distinguishing them from a large group of wooden churches in the Opole voivodeship.

History

The village was first mentioned in 1260; the existence of the parish from the first half of the 14th century is attested by records. The former wooden church was built probably in the 15th century and was used by Protestants in 1524-1701. The present shape of the church dates back to 1748, when the church was built anew or underwent full-scale alterations. It was covered with weatherboards and slightly altered in the modern era. The church belongs to the parish of St. Elizabeth of Hungary in Klucz.

Description

The church is located on a hill in the centre of the village, surrounded by streets forming a small village square. To the north of it, there is a Lourdes Grotto, a shrine with a sculpture of St. John of Nepomuk, and a stone crucifix. The site is encircled by a paved path and surrounded by a modern fence. The preserved remains of the former cemetery include two tomb crosses.

The church is oriented towards the east, wooden, built as a log structure, with a post-and-beam tower, on a tall foundation. It consists of a short chancel closed off on three sides and a nave on a plan in the shape similar to a square, with diagonal eastern walls. To the west, the nave adjoins a tower annex which is equal in height to the nave and can be accessed by covered stairs to north (formerly on the opposite side of the tower). The northern wall of the chancel adjoins a sacristy with a founders' gallery on the upper storey, and next to it there is a low annex with stairs to the pulpit; part of the annex is adjacent to the nave. The body of the church is compact and homogenous, covered with a double-ridge roof, with smoothly interconnected planes; the low tower is topped with a tented roof, and the sacristy is surmounted by an extended plane of the chancel roof. Over the eastern edge of the nave there is an octagonal steeple turret, with a small cupola, clad with wood shingles like other roofs. The façades of the church are clad with vertically positioned weatherboards. The windows are topped with flat arches, rectangular, and glazed with coloured stained glass. Over the western door to the nave, there is a decorative insert next to the lock, depicting a soldier.

The interior is covered with flat ceilings. The choir is on the western side of the nave, simple, and supported by four pillars with capitals. The rood beam is profiled; the founders' gallery opens towards the interior with a rectangular opening. The church features uniform antique fixtures and fittings including a Baroque main altar and Late Baroque side altars, with sculptures of holy figures. The neoclassical pulpit dates from the first half of the 19th century.

The structure can be viewed from the outside; the interior is open to visitors during services or by arrangement with the parish priest.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 09-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII, issue 14, T. Chrzanowski and M. Kornecki (eds.), pp. 58-59.
  • Emmerling D., Wierzgoń A., Opolskie kościoły drewniane, Opole 2006, p. 80.
  • Architectural monument record sheet: Filial Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Zimna Wódka, prepared by W. Żurakowski, 2001, Archives of the Voivodeship Monuments Protection Office in Opole.
  • Website of the parish of St. Elizabeth of Hungary in Klucz, 09.09.2014.

transport time to the next site

12 min

Parish Church of St Elizabeth of Hungary
Klucz

30 minutes

The parish church in Klucz is one of three wooden churches in the Parish of St Elizabeth of Hungary. The time of their construction is not determined unambiguously, but they all share the date 1748 when they were built or thoroughly rebuilt. The churches are similar which makes them stand out among a large group of wooden churches in the Opole region: their distinctive feature is a low tower incorporated into the body of the temple.The village of Klucz is famous for its traditional floral decorations prepared by the residents for the Corpus Christi, often in the form of complex, floral carpets rolled out on the route of the procession.

History

The village of Klucz was first time mentioned in written records in 1234 as “Cluce.” Some documents of 1319 refer to a parish priest in Klucz, and the Peter’s pence register from 1447 mentions a parish in the Ujazdów archpresbytery, having the wooden church of unknown size and appearance. The date of opening the present church has not been clearly determined. Today’s form of the temple dates from 1748 when it was rebuilt, or perhaps erected anew. At the beginning of the 20th century, it was partly covered with weatherboard and extended by the tower annexes. In the 2nd half of the 20th century, the main entrance was moved to the ground level of the west tower wall. During the renovation in 2003, the ceiling paintings were exposed.

Description

The church is situated in the central part of the village, on a relatively high elevation. The church is east-oriented, with a historic rectory on the south-west side and a contemporary bell tower on the east side. From the side of the road, in a brick wall encircling the foot the the hill, there is a 1924 shrine with the folk sculpture of St John of Nepomuk. The church is available from the west side by steep steps and from the south, through a gate in the fence, from the rectory yard.

The church is made of wood and is of the Baroque character. The church was built as a log structure and post-and-beam structure (tower), on a stone base. The short, rectangular nave joins the three-sided chancel through oblique walls. The tower, along with the small annexes on both sides, adjoins the nave from the west. North of the chancel and at the diagonal section of the nave there is the sacristy with the founder’s lodge on the upper level; a porch adjoins the south nave wall with a storeroom on the upper deck.

The body of the church is compact and uniform; the dominating element is a polygonal ave-bell turret over the east edge of the nave. The church is covered with a double-ridge roof with seamlessly connected planes whose extension also covered the sacristy with porch. Over the low tower, there is a tented roof, slightly protruding over the ridge of the main roof. All roofs, the upper tower level, the polygonal cupola over the turret and the gable of the nave are shingled. All façades are covered with vertical weatherboards.The windows in the tower and annexes are rectangular; the other are terminated with flat arches and glazed with colourful stained glass.

Initially, the entrance openings are braced in massive door hardware: 1) in the south wall of the tower with a decorative lintel. The door features a forged lock with an insert in the shape of a human figure, similar to the figure of a soldier on the church door in Zimna Wódka, 2) in the west wall of the nave, rectangular, with the date 1748, 3) between the nave and south terminated with a flat arch, 4) between the chancel and sacristy also terminated with an arch.

The interior is covered with a flat ceiling, with crown moulding over the chancel; beam ceilings are seen over the sacristy and in the tower. The polychromy discovered in 2003 depicts the Holy Cross against the firmament over the central part of the chancel; over the nave, there are Sts Augustine, Jerome, Ambrose and Gregory, surrounded by fields with floral ornamentations. The simple choir on the west side of the nave is supported by two pillars with profiled heads. Among the church fittings, there are late Baroque altars from the 1st half of the 18th century. Each altar is flanked by Gothic and Baroque sculptures on consoles. The pulpit, font, confessional, pews and founder’s benches as well as some paintings date from the 18th century.

The structure is available from outside; access to the interior during services or after an arrangement with the parish priest.

Compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 16-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, t. VII, z. 14, red. T. Chrzanowski i M. Kornecki, s. 28-29.
  • Emmerling D., Wierzgoń A., Opolskie kościoły drewniane, Opole 2006, s. 38.
  • Parochie Klutschau und Ihre Holzkirchen, nn,  Schlesische Provinzialblätter, 1873, B.12, H. 10, s.476, 493-494.

transport time to the next site

8 min

Filial Church of St Mary of the Snows
Olszowa

30 minutes

The church in Olszowa is one of the three wooden churches in the Parish of St. Elizabeth of Hungary. The time of their construction is not determined unambiguously, but they all share the date 1748 when they were built or thoroughly altered. The churches are similar which makes them stand out among a large group of wooden churches in the Opole voivodeship: their distinctive feature is a low tower incorporated into the body of the church.

History

The village was founded in the 13th century. The first mention of it dates from 1302, when Olszowa was mentioned among the villages obliged to give tithes to the Cistercian monastery in Jemielnica. From the beginning the village belonged to the parish in Klucz mentioned in records since 1319. The wooden church is described in the reports on seventeenth-century visits; until around 1688, it was dedicated to St. Hedwig. Today’s form of the church dates from 1748 when it was altered, or perhaps erected anew. It was renovated in 1988 and 2007. The whole structure was covered with weatherboards in the second half of the 20th century.

Description

The church is located at the eastern edge of the village, at the fork of roads leading to Zimna Wódka and the fields. It is oriented towards the east, situated in a rectangular cemetery, surrounded by a stone wall. In front of the church, there is a stone cross with a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary placed in the niche.

The church is made of wood and is designed in Baroque style. It was built as a log structure and post-and-beam structure (tower), on a stone and brick foundation. The building consists of a wider with a floor plan in the shape resembling a square, joined by diagonal walls with a short chancel closed off on three sides. To the west, the nave adjoins a square tower, to the north it adjoins the chancel — sacristy with a founder's gallery on the upper level, which can be accessed via stairs running against the wall of the nave. The body of the church is dominated by a newer polygonal steeple turret located over the eastern edge of the nave and covered with a pyramidal roof. The roofs over the tower and nave share the ridge. The northern planes of the roofs over the nave and the much lower chancel are extended, forming wide eaves beside the nave and hiding the sacristy with a gallery next to the chancel. The stairway annex is covered by a lean-to roof. All roofs are clad with wood shingles; façades were covered with vertically positioned weatherboards in recent times. The windows are topped with flat arches and glazed with stained glass.

Under the nave there is a flat ceiling, the chancel is covered with a flat ceiling with crown moulding, and the sacristy and the tower are topped with beamed ceilings. The profiled rood beam features a Baroque Crucifixion group. The choir gallery featuring a simple parapet is supported by two pairs of pillars with decorative capitals. The founder's gallery opens to the interior with a bipartite rectangular opening. The fixtures and fittings include, among others, Baroque frame main altar with a contemporary painting depicting the Adoration of Saint Mary of the Snows; architectural Baroque side altars with paintings from the 18th century and contemporary paintings; Classicist pulpit with paintings depicting Four Evangelists and a folk sculpture of the Pensive Christ. The whole interior is covered with weatherboards in natural wood colour.

The structure can be viewed from the outside; the interior is open to visitors during services or by arrangement with the parish priest.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 22-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Katalog zabytków sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII, issue 14, T. Chrzanowski and M. Kornecki (eds.), pp. 35-36.
  • Emmerling D., Wierzgoń A., Opolskie kościoły drewniane, Opole 2006, p. 58.
  • Parochie Klutschau und Ihre Holzkirchen, nn, Schlesische Provinzialblätter, 1873, B.12, H. 10, 493-494 and H.11, p. 532 (fig.)

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