Śladami SOP - ETAP 1 - w ciągu rzeki Bobrzy i Łośnej
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Joanna Rek

Śladami SOP - ETAP 1 - w ciągu rzeki Bobrzy i Łośnej

4

several hours

świętokrzyskie

Industrial complex of the former Białogońskie Works along with an industrial residential estate
Kielce

30 minutes

A comprehensive industrial complex originating from the 1st half of the 19th century, preserved in the urban scale, characterised by representative factory buildings and extensive residential and administrative buildings — subordinated to an axial spatial arrangement.

History

The works in Białogon near Kielce were to serve the purpose of smelting copper, silver, and partially also lead from the local deposits. The construction was started in 1814, according to a design by J. F. Moritz; the metalworks were named "Aleksander". The infrastructure created had symmetrical, axial layout and is comprised a complex of factory buildings and a workers' housing estate. In 1817, a water system including a pond with a causeway, weirs, and internal hydro-power system, was commissioned. In 1820, the construction of the works was completed and at the same time the construction of the workers' housing estate was started. The estate was designed by German constructor Karol Khake. The metalworks were closed in 1827 due to technical problems, but soon thereafter Prince Drucki-Lubecki (the then minister of treasury of the Kingdom of Poland) decided to convert the works into a machines factory. The conversion and modernisation were carried out under the supervision of engineer W. Preacher. In 1831, new rolling mill departments (of copper, brass, and lead) and a new sheet metal tin coating department were commissioned, and in 1834 — a cast iron foundry; in 1832, the forge was extended. Also the hydro-power supply system was converted, with a new great wheel on an iron shaft. In 1836, the modernisation was ended and the site of the works was fenced.  Between 1833 and 1845, the factory was administered by the Bank of Poland. The works in Białogon had then the greatest capacity of mechanical energy in the Old-Polish Industrial Area, and 240 people of staff. Industrial production devices for local industrial facilities were manufactured here, and also farming equipment and various tools. In the 2nd of the 19th century, the works fell into decline.  In 1898, engineer L. Skibiński started to lease the works; he restores them, replacing old devices and introducing new technologies. Mass production of cast iron pipes and outlet pipes is commenced; new workers' houses also start to appear. After the World War I, the works remain in the hand of the Skibiński family and operate under the name of Mechanical Works and Cast Iron Foundry "Białogon", with the production profile unchanged. In 1939-1944, the factory is managed by German occupation authorities. In 1945, the whole plant is nationalised. In the 1960s., a thorough modernisation of the plant was commenced; its production profile and name were modified (Kielce Pump Factory "Białogon"), most of the machine park was replaced (the old machines were donated to the Museum of Technology in Sielpia), there were conversions and extensions, and new facilities were created. The water system was diluted (part of the pond and uncovered channels were filled). In 1997 the plant was purchased from the State Treasury by a joint-stock company with shareholding of the plant's workers. At present, it operates under the name "Kielecka Fabryka Pomp BIAŁOGON S.A." (Kielce Pump Factory "Białogon" Joint-Stock Company) and produces pumps and cast iron moulds.

Description

The industrial complex is located in the south-western district of Kielce (former Białogon settlement is now included into the administrative borders of the city), by the route to Cracow. It was created based of the principle of comprehensive planning and completion of investments, applied in the 1st half of the 19th century. All spatial elements were subordinated to the principle of axial arrangement, with the system of access roads and the representative factory architectural complex at the entrance used as a framework; the water system was left aside, outside the boundaries of the complex. The main accent of the layout was constituted by a complex of factory buildings with a square in front of if, located on the side of the housing estate and shaped as a half of a decagon. The square gathered outlets of five radial streets opening to the gate of the factory yard. The main, widened street, built along the axis of the plant towards the east, connects the plant with the route Kielce-Cracow, and the street perpendicular to it separates the plant site from residential buildings also today. The factory complex was originally comprised of four separate pavilions encasing the factory square from three sides. The square was enclosed from the east by a gate flanked by two symmetrical gate-houses and auxiliary buildings. Of this historical buildings, whose symmetrical axial layout had been distorted as a result of continuous evolution of the production functions of the plant, only three main buildings (partially converted): the middle buildings of the former metalworks and forgery, and side buildings which were once rolling mills and a gate-house, were preserved until today. Built on rectangular plans and featuring variegated proportions, they were made of split stone, were one-storey, with gable roofs. They were originally plastered. The former metalworks were converted into a workshop hall, and later on into a warehouse (currently, it is not used), and the former rolling mills — into auxiliary buildings (currently used only partially). The water system is no longer discernible within the site, and neither the adjoining residential estate avoided substantial spatial and construction interference. The layout of streets has been preserved, but only some  residential houses made it to our times, and even those were significantly transformed (mainly by extensions and modernisation of the façade). They were one-storey buildings, partially with basements, with half-hip roofs; built on a rectangular floor plan, featuring a two-bay layout, and originally intended for 2-4 families. Next to the residential houses, there were also supplementary facilities housing a school, offices, house of the management board — also currently converted and transformed into flats. In the north-eastern part of the square of the residential estate, there is a wooden church, founded in the early 20th century by L. Skibiński, the then lessee.

The site is fenced and available upon arrangement with the User; the area of the housing estate is generally accessible, the houses are owned by private owners

Compiled by Włodzimierz Pedrycz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Kielce, 02.12.2014.

 

  • Filling cards: Zespół Huty „Aleksander”. Hala odlewni mosiądzu, Hala odlewni, Hala kotlarni i modelarni, Portiernia, Budynek biurowy, Budynek szkoły, Domy mieszkalne robotnicze, compiled by Z. M. Łabęcki, Kielce 1994; Fabryka pomp ”Białogon” - układ hydroenergetyczny compiled by G. Balińska, J.A. Baliński, Kielce 1999 [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach i Archiwum Narodowego Instytutu Dziedzictwa w Warszawie].
  • Dumała K., Przemiany przestrzenne miast i rozwój osiedli przemysłowych w Królestwie Polskim w latach 1831-1869, Wrocław - Warszawa - Kraków - Gdańsk 1974.
  • Koźminski K., Zagłębie Staropolskie w Kieleckiem, Warszawa 1955.
  • Krygier E., Katalog Zabytków Budownictwa Przemysłowego w Polsce, Wrocław-Warszawa 1959, vol. 2, fasc. 2, powiat Kielce - województwo kieleckie.
  • Pazdur. J., Zakłady Metalowe w Białogonie 1614-1914, Wrocław 1957.
  • Radwan M., Rudy, kuźnice i huty żelaza w Polsce, Warszawa 1963.
  • Rey A., Zagadnienia energetyki wodnej w budownictwie przemysłowym Zagłębia Staropolskiego w I połowie XIX w., Kwartalnik Urbanistyki i Architektury 1957, vol. II. fasc. 3-4.
  • Rey A., Geneza i rozwój układów przestrzennych zakładów hutniczych w Zagłębiu Staropolskim., Kwartalnik Urbanistyki i Architektury 1966, vol. XI. fasc. 2.
  • Szczepański J., Modernizacja Górnictwa i Hutnictwa w Królestwie Polskim w I połowie XIXw. Rola specjalistów niemieckich i brytyjskich, Kielce 1997.
  • Wojewódzki R., Najcenniejsze zabytki techniki - Białogon; w miesięczniku IKAR, no 12 (28) 1995, no 1 (29)  1996r.
  • Zieliński J., Staropolskie Zagłębie Przemysłowe, Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków 1965.

transport time to the next site

27 min

Blast furnace plant
Kuźniaki

30 minutes

An example of the 19th-century industrial complex in Poland with a blast furnace of a distinctive, pyramid-shape shaft.

History

The area of today’s Świętokrzyskie, abounding in ore, wood and water, has been known for its steel industry for ages. The industry began to flourished in the 1st half of the 19th century, mainly due to the investment of the government of the then Congress Kingdom of Poland. Besides larger plants, also smaller private initiatives were developing, among them the first furnaces in Kuźniaki. Already in the 2nd half of the 18th century, Kużniaki was home to, first quarter- and then half-furnace integrated with a water hammery (perhaps at the beginning of the 19th century in the possession of the Kołłątaj family). In 1844 there were three metallurgical plants active in addition to the blast furnace. In the years 1860-1870, a new blast furnace was constructed operated the Jewish entrepreneur, Szlama Orner. Modified ca. 1890, the furnace was operated until 1897. The products were pipes, grids, sheet, crosses, and railings. After the decommissioning of the blast furnace, a wheel-driven mill was installed in the adjacent building, using the existing water system. later it was powered by a turbine and operated until 1955. The plant was closed down in the following years and the buildings fell into disrepair. In the years 1967-1968, the blast furnace was secured against collapse. By the 1980s, the water system had been considerably transformed: the spillway was disintegrated, the causeway was converted into a road, the canal was destroyed and the pond turned weedy. The condition of the production building (later the mill) without the equipment dramatically deteriorated. Only the blast furnace structure has endured the test of time as a clear, permanent ruin (in the 1960s it was secured by the personnel of Zawiercie Steelworks). It has remained so ever since. Today, the area around the blast furnace is a private property; it is fenced and clear although no specific information about its historical value is provided. Visible are also the remnants of the former water system, especially the old spillway, overflow and outlet duct.

Description

The remains of the plant are to be found between a small river (part of the watercourse of the Wierna River) and the municipal road Kielce-Mniów. Of the former blast furnace plant, only the ruins of the furnace are left along with the traces of the water system (an outline of the pond and causeway, the outlet duct under the road, parts of the underground canal, partly filled up with stone debris). The area of the plant is in private hands; next to the remains of the furnace, there are meadows, an orchard and garden, and residential and farm buildings. The blast furnace has survived as a permanent, yet visible ruin in the shape of a truncated, narrowing pyramid, square in plan with a circular interior; at the base of the furnace, there are four arched openings. The structure was built of quarry stone (local reddish sandstone) with the wedge elements in the openings and corner elements at the sides; the wall is partly covered with vegetation.

The area around the blast furnace is fenced; the structure is visible but beyond reach (private property); other elements of the water system are generally accessible

Compiled by Włodzimierz Pedrycz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Kielce, 07.11.2014.

Bibliography

  • Karta ewidencyjna. Zakład wielkopiecowy, oprac. B. Paprocki, Kielce 1980 [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach i Archiwum Narodowego Instytutu Dziedzictwa w Warszawie].
  • Guldon Z., Kaczor J., Górnictwo i hutnictwo w Staropolskim Okręgu Przemysłowym w drugiej połowie XVIII wieku, Kielce 1994.
  • Koźminski K., Zagłębie Staropolskie w Kieleckiem, Warszawa 1955.
  • Krygier E., Katalog Zabytków Budownictwa Przemysłowego w Polsce, Wrocław-Warszawa 1959, t.II, z.2, powiat Kielce.
  • Radwan M., Wielkopiecownictwo w Zagłębiu Staropolskim w połowie XIX wieku, Stalinogród 1954.
  • Suliga. I., Rozwój technologii hutniczych na przestrzeni wieków w Staropolskim Zagłębiu Przemysłowym - referat na Sesji Naukowej - 200 lat Huty w Ostrowcu Świętokrzyskim - 17.05.2013 [www.200lathutywostrowcu.pl].
  • Wojewódzki R., Najcenniejsze zabytki techniki - Kuźniaki; w miesięczniku IKAR, nr 3 (43) z 1997r.

transport time to the next site

16 min

Remains of blast furnace works
Bobrza

two hours

individual and monumental spatial arrangement demonstrating daring plans, execution and technique of the former industrial construction, as well as the landscape value of the complex

History

The former blast-furnace plant is one of the monuments of technology which has developed for centuries in the region today known as Świętokrzyskie. The northern part of the region which is now referred to as Old-Polish Industrial Region or Old-Polish Industrial Area, was a site for ore mines, blast furnaces, iron works and manufactures of tools and armaments. Planned industrialisation started after 1815, in what then constituted Russian Partition, mainly due to the activity of Stanisław Staszic, priest Drucki-Lubecki, and the Bank of Poland.  The remains of the blast furnace works originate precisely from that period. The construction was started in 1926 in accordance to a design by mining consultant Lempe, which envisaged five blast furnaces along with accompanying structures. Until 1830, the following structures were built: a reserve pond with lower and upper channel, retaining wall for the plant area on which warehouses, coal depots, auxiliary furnaces and residential buildings were erected; the blast furnaces themselves were not constructed - work had been stopped by the November Uprising, and was never resumed thereafter. In 1833, the Bank of Poland, the then owner of the facility, located a nails manufacture in Bobrza, which was liquidated in 1863. In 1873, the works went under management of the Kielce District Office, and as of 1884, they became private property. Subsequent owners carried out their own craft activities here - first, there were blacksmith workshops, then a weaving plant. Supposedly, no new investments were carried out, and the activities were based on the former, adapted, and partially converted structures. Weather conditions (including floods), lack of one purpose, or often improper use resulted in degradation and partial destruction of the complex. In the times of the Polish People's Republic, the works were nationalised, and the Knitting Plant "Elekta" was housed in the complex. In the 1920s, the plant discontinued its activities. In the meantime, the site of the former blast furnace plant and the adjacent area of the water system underwent numerous proprietary changes and their actual status is as follows: area of the former plant (along with the retaining wall) — property of Miedziana Góra commune; water system area and part of the residential estate - private property. In the years after the war, renovations and partial reconstruction of the retaining wall were carried out, as well as maintenance renovations of the buildings in use; the water system was converted for the purposes of a recreational resort. In the recent years, the commune started activities (projects, cleaning works and renovation) aimed at providing access to the former plant and developing the area for public purposes.

Description

The structure is located near the Kielce-Łódź route — at present in Miedziana Góra commune. It is situated on a wide plateau with a steep slope descending to the west, to the river Bobrza, which flows at the foot of the hill. The hill (probably after necessary levelling), surrounded with a retaining wall, was earmarked for the plant site. The intention of the constructors of the early 19th century was that the new industrial complex (located on two levels - a difference of approx. 17 m) would comprise: a complex of production preparation and administration buildings (on the plateau), formidable retaining wall, system of blast furnaces (at the feet of the wall), water system (connected with the river Bobrza), and residential estate with auxiliary buildings (farther into the plateau). The planned size of the complex was impressive - it were to be the largest blast furnace iron smelters comprising the key facilities of the Old-Polish Industrial Area. Only part of the complex was built: the retaining wall, part of production buildings, part of the water system, and the residential estate. Retaining wall - due to its impressive size, thoroughness of craftsmanship and shape reminiscent of the old tradition of earth ramparts, it is without equivalent in Poland. Built on a plan of a shallow U, with total length of approx. 500 m, it is up to 16 m high, ca. 5.5 m thick at the base, and approx. 3.5 thick at the top section. It is made of local sandstone in different shades of brown. It is comprised of irregular main core and external face bound with it, and bricked up horizontally. In times of its existence, the wall was most probably many times repaired and secured and the state of preservation of its individual parts varies. The most spectacular (and best preserved) is its southern part, comprised of two perpendicular sections — a southern and a western one; in the substantial part, the height of the wall preserved is similar to its original height - approx. 16 m. The central and northern sections were heavily destroyed — they are interrupted by landslide slopes, pond marsh, overgrown with vegetation and devoid of the face layer. Water system was planned as a whole and never completed. Until 1830, some elements of the system were built — the bottom working channel, water wheel cage, parts of earth dam, and possibly also the upper working channel. Most of them were obliterated over years by the forces of nature and by human intervention (conversions and adaptations). The system was used, inter alia, for the purposes related to a mill, fish ponds, and recreational resort. At present, the lower working channel and the stone abutment of the weir are discernible. Two coal depots were located on the upper terrace of the blast furnace works. The remains of the southern depot - built on a rectangular plan, survived until today. It was a single-storey structure, with basement and gable roof, made of local split sandstone with brick elements; originally, it was carefully finished and had a wooden shingle roof. At present, only its outer walls and the pillar structure of the ceiling over the basements exist. The building of the former management (smelter master house), which is located further on to the south-east, is a single-storey structure built on a rectangular floor plan, with a half-hip roof. Currently used as a residential building, it retained its original fabric to a significant extent. Also the following buildings survived (even if significantly converted): former industrial hall and part of residential buildings of the in-house estate. The buildings show signs of modest, but stylish Classicist development; they represented robust construction technology of that time, skilfully adapted to the functions dictated by the industry.

Area of the complex is mostly accessible.

Compiled by Włodzimierz Pedrycz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Kielce, 28.08.2014

Bibliography

  • Karty ewidencyjne: - Zakład wielkopiecowy”, compiled by K. Cygorijni 1977; - Skład na węgiel w zakładzie wielkopiecowym „węgielnia”, compiled by Z. Wojtasik 1985; - Hala w zakładzie wielkopiecowym,  compiled by FASC. Wojtasik 1984, - Budynek d. Zarządu, compiled by K. Cygorijni 1977, - Mur oporowy, compiled by compiled by K. Cygorijni 1977 i Z. Wojtasik 1985; - Układ wodny, compiled by K. Cygorijni 1977 [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach i Archiwum Narodowego Instytutu Dziedzictwa w Warszawie].
  • Bielecki J.W. Kalendarium dziejów Bobrzy, Koncepcja udostępnienia i zagospodarowania na cele publiczne zabytkowego Zakładu Wielkopiecowego w Bobrzy z monumentalnym murem oporowym, Kielce 2005, [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach].
  • Gąsiorowska-Grabowska N. Z dziejów przemysłu w Królestwie Polskim, Warszawa 1965.
  • Guldon Z., Kaczor J., Górnictwo i hutnictwo w Staropolskim Okręgu Przemysłowym w drugiej połowie XVIII wieku, Kielce 1994.
  • Hryniak E, Penkalla A., Dokumentacja Historyczno-Architektoniczna Zakładu Przemysłowego w Bobrzy, P.P. Pracownie Konserwacji Zabytków Oddział w Kielcach, Kielce 1977.
  • Koźminski K., Zagłębie Staropolskie w Kieleckiem, Warszawa 1955.
  • Krygier E., Katalog Zabytków Budownictwa Przemysłowego w Polsce, Wrocław-Warszawa 1959, vol.II, fasc.2, powiat Kielce.
  • Radwan M., Rudy, kuźnice i huty żelaza w Polsce, Warszawa 1963.
  • Rey A., Geneza i rozwój układów przestrzennych zakładów hutniczych w Zagłębiu Staropolskim., Kwartalnik Urbanistyki i Architektury 1966, vol.XI. fasc.2.
  • Szczepański J., Modernizacja górnictwa i hutnictwa w Królestwie Polskim w I połowie XIX w. Rola specjalistów niemieckich i brytyjskich, Kielce 1997.
  • Wojewódzki R., Najcenniejsze zabytki techniki - Bobrza; w miesięczniku IKAR, no 9 (13) z 1994r.
  • Zieliński J., Staropolskie Zagłębie Przemysłowe, Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków 1965.

transport time to the next site

7 min

Remains of an industrial plant complex
Samsonów

one hour

An example of a monumental, carefully designed and laid out - in terms of function, space and technology - industrial complex of the 1st half of the 19th century.

History

The remains of the former plant are one of the technical monuments of the industry that developed in the Świętokrzyskie region over centuries. The regular industrialisation started after 1815, mainly due to the activity of Stanisław Staszic, the Rev. Drucki-Lubecki and the Bank of Poland.  The facility in Samsonów was built in that period. The foundation stone for the new plant was laid in 1818 by the governor of the Congress Kingdom of Poland, General Józef Zajączek, and the facility opened in 1823 and was renamed Józef Steelworks. Some foreign experts were behind the design and construction, among them Bogumił Schmidt and the mining specialist Frederick Lempe, and perhaps Henryk Grabkowski. The complex comprised a blast furnace with iron foundry and workshop as well as a storage and workers’ houses. In 1824 some adjustment were made to the blast furnace and the foundry was commissioned. In 1829 bellows were installed on the water wheel and steam engine, and in 1835 the blast furnace was readjusted again. The production covered pig-iron and military and utility equipment. After the fire of the blast furnace in 1866, the facility ceased its operation, and the facility began to fall into disrepair. During WWI, the hoist tower was partially destroyed in warfare. In 1922 the area of the former plant, as a "mining property with a pond and factory ruins”, was purchased from the Ministry of Industry and Trade by individual investors. In 1976 the property was purchased by the Voivodeship Conservator of Historical Monuments in Kielce for the State Treasury. In the years 1981-1983, the necessary works were carried out to secure the area as a permanent ruin. In 1995 the area of the plant became the municipal property and has remained in the possession of Zagnańsk municipality until today. 

Description

The former blast furnace plant is located on the local Miedziana Góra-Odrowąż road, at the junction with the road to Zagnańsk. It originally consisted of a water power system, factory buildings and a residential estate. The reservoir, supplied by the Bobrza River and situated in the south-east part of the complex, was connected by means of an oblique inlet canal with the blast furnace facility; culverts were also originally there. Today, they do not exist any more, nor does the reservoir. The situation of the main complex of factory buildings, gathered around the blast furnace, was designed in a classicistic manner as noble residences of the late 18th century. This is an axial layout, with the central, dominant structure of the blast furnace and hoist tower, and the foundry and yards located farther along the axis; they are flanked by two, symmetrically arranged two-storey production buildings (model shop, drying shop, forgery, paint shop, carpentry). The blast furnace and tower were surrounded by auxiliary buildings, e.g. the coal storage, engine room (controlling the water wheel at the tower and the steam engine by the furnace); there are also inlets of technical canals running under the complex in vaulted underground tunnels. The complex had both a monumental and aesthetic character with well designed proportions. The front wall of the complex (south façade) was a seven-axis structure with a three-panel entrance in a centrally located avant-corps. The blast furnace stands on a base in the form of a cubic block with the truncated cone of the chimney placed on it (originally of considerable height); the adjacent hoist tower is higher - rectangular on the ground floor and pyramid-shaped above (originally topped with a high lantern). Currently, these buildings are in a state of permanent ruin. The layout, scale and proportions of the complex are still visible, yet the detailed architectural solutions have not been preserved. Other auxiliary factory buildings (now in ruins) were scattered on the west and north side of the complex of blast furnace; to the south, outside the yard, there was the housing estate - now only one house has remained, yet considerably altered. The buildings of the plant are made of quarry stone, and the shaft of the blast furnace is lined with bossage. The whole thing was probably plastered, and the architectural design elements were exposed. The roof truss and the ceilings (except for the vaulted basement) were made of wood, and the roofs covered with shingles. The complex is well-maintained and quite well adapted to sightseeing.

The area is partially fenced and publicly available; from Tuesday through Saturday: 8:00-4:00pm - guided tours in consultation with the nearby Tourist Information.

Compiled by Włodzimierz Pedrycz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Kielce, 16.10.2014.

Bibliography

  • Karta ewidencyjna. Zakład wielkopiecowy „Zakład Wielkiego Pieca Huta Józefa” z osiedlem przyzakładowym i Zespół budynków przemysłowych przy wielkim piecu w zakładzie wielkopiecowym „Zakładzie Wielkiego Pieca Huta Józefów”, oprac. Z. Wojtasik, Kielce 1986 [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach i Archiwum Narodowego Instytutu Dziedzictwa w Warszawie].
  • Gąsiorowska-Grabowska N. Z dziejów przemysłu w Królestwie Polskim, Warszawa 1965.
  • Koźminski K., Zagłębie Staropolskie w Kieleckiem, Warszawa 1955.
  • Krygier E., Katalog Zabytków Budownictwa Przemysłowego w Polsce, Wrocław-Warszawa 1959, t.II, z.2, powiat Kielce.
  • Penkalla A., Zakład przemysłowy i osiedle mieszkaniowe w Samsonowie, Dokumentacja Historyczno - Architektoniczna PKZ o/Kielce, Kielce 1978 [Archiwum Świętokrzyskiego Wojewódzkiego Konserwatora Zabytków w Kielcach].
  • Radwan M., Rudy, kuźnice i huty żelaza w Polsce, Warszawa 1963.
  • Rey A., Geneza i rozwój układów przestrzennych zakładów hutniczych w Zagłębiu Staropolskim., Kwartalnik Urbanistyki i Architektury 1966, t.XI. z.2.
  • Starz M., Zagnańsk, Samsonów, Tumlin, Ćmińsk; Z dziejów osad nad górną Bobrzą, Kielce 1995.
  • Szczepański J., Modernizacja Górnictwa i Hutnictwa w Królestwie Polskim w I połowie XIXw. Rola specjalistów niemieckich i brytyjskich, Kielce 1997.
  • Wojewódzki R., Najcenniejsze zabytki techniki - Samsonów; w miesięczniku IKAR, nr 10 (14) z 1994r.
  • Zieliński J., Staropolskie Zagłębie Przemysłowe, Wrocław-Warszawa-Kraków 1965.

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