Piastowskie Opole
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Joanna Banik

Piastowskie Opole

12

several hours

opolskie

Piast Tower
Opole

30 minutes

The Gothic Piast Tower on the Pasieka island in Opole is one of the most valuable monuments of the city and important dominant feature in the panorama of Opole. It plays the role of the symbol of Opole and Opole Voivodeship. It is the only surviving remnant of the Piast castle demolished in 1928-1931 situated in one of the parts of Opole called Ostrówek. The monument is a classic example of a donjon-type tower of ultimate defence.

The Piast Tower is also a background of scenography of the annual National Festival of Polish Song taking place in Opole, hence it is well-known throughout Poland. In 2014, it was the winner of the contest of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage — Well-Kept Monument.

History

The cylindrical brick tower was constructed by Duke Bolko I probably in the later 18th century and is one of the oldest monuments of this type in Poland. Originally, it was a fragment of the castle complex built in the area of a former fortified settlement. The tower was located inside defensive walls, adjacent to the entrance gate. In 1602, repairs work was done at the tower and the tower was covered with a new roof. The whole complex was going through various vicissitudes: in 1615, 1737 and 1739 it was destroyed by fire, then it was reconstructed. In 1838-1855, the fortifications were demolished and the area was levelled. After 1860, the castle was adapted for use as district offices. In connection with the construction of the new Upper Silesian District (1931-1933), in 1928-1931 the whole complex was demolished, leaving only the tower.

The tower has changed its shape many times over the centuries. Its appearance varied in the 14th and 15th century, changes to the crown were made in 1608, 1730, 1740, 1838, 1890, 1906, 1934, 1938, 1953, and 1962.

As a result of architectural studies conducted in 2011, the history of the tower can be divided into 10 periods:

Phase I - Gothic I, phase II - Gothic II, phase III - Gothic/early Renaissance, phase IV - late Renaissance, phase V - Baroque, phase VI - 1835-1855, phase VII - ca. 1880, phase VIII - ca. 1906, phase IX - ca. 1934, and phase X - ca. 1962.

Based on the aforementioned studies the monument underwent thorough conservation in 2012-2013.

Description

The Piast Tower is located in Opole on the Pasieka Island, in its northern part called Ostrówek, in the vicinity of the modernist Upper Silesian District Building which was erected on the site formerly occupied by the demolished Piast castle and today houses the Voivodeship Office and part of the Marshal’s Office of the Opole Voivodeship, between this building and the amphitheatre.

The building consists of five overground storeys separated by cornices. The fourth storey is crowned with a decorative arcade frieze. The lowest storey, previously not accessible from the outside, served as a hunger dungeon. The entrance was located in the armoury, about 9 m above the ground and led through a wooden gallery running around the tower, connected to the walls. The upper storeys housed a chamber, kitchen, and storage rooms. The uppermost storey was designed to be used for active defence purposes.

The interior is cylindrical in shape on the ground floor, then turns into a hexagon in the upper parts, and returns to its oval shape in the penultimate storey. A wooden staircase is designed to provide vertical access, only the second and third storeys are connected by a staircase running through the thickness of the wall and consisting of brick steps.

In addition to improving the technical condition and introducing educational functions, the Conservation works conducted in 2012-2013 brought interesting scientific findings. The walled-up brick bond sockets revealed fragments of stone supports, on which a wooden gallery running around the tower was probably resting. The walls of the corridor leading out of the tower revealed very important findings including medieval rites, drawings and inscriptions, probably made by castle guards. Fragments of Renaissance plasters and an inscription made on plaster during renovation in the late 19th century were also discovered and conserved. Thin-layer plasters and slaked lime were used for finishing the inner walls, emphasising the texture of the brick wall and stone embankment. At the ground floor level, cement plasters were removed and brick walls were exposed; unfortunately, the walls were covered with facing in the 1930s. All the masonry bonds have been preserved in their diversity; the original shape of the joints has been respected and preserved. Renovations included the installation of lighting, fire, alarm, heating systems and multimedia projection equipment (Bolko I's speech, shadow theatre, animated panorama of old Opole).

The silhouette of the tower has remained unchanged. The cupola has gained a new lighter ceramic tile cladding, and its structure has been renovated and reinforced. The terrace has been renovated in order to ensure tightness, new ceramic flooring and new rainwater drains were installed. It is very important because the rain damaged the tower due to moisture penetration especially strong in the upper parts. The heated floor of the terrace facilitates the removal of snow deposited in the winter.

During the work the causes of the destructive processes were effectively eliminated, and their effects were also removed (as far as possible due to technological process). A successive correction, among others, to the salinity of the walls, has been planned for the coming years.

The terrace balustrade was clad with copper sheet metal, and a stainless steel balustrade was also installed for safety reasons. Under the sill there are cameras that capture the panorama of the city, the images from which are available in the basement of the Voivodeship Office adapted for use as tourist facilities. The facilities may be used by people with disabilities or others who have difficulty in climbing up stairs. Tourist facilities for the tower are located in the basement of the building of the Voivodeship Office.

The monument is open to visitors.

compiled by Maria Burian, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 18-05-2015.

Bibliography

  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII, Województwo opolskie, issue 11: Miasto Opole i powiat opolski, T. Chrzanowski and M. Kornecki (eds.), pp. 5, 33-34.
  • Opolski Informator Konserwatorski, Opole 2012, pp. 103-120.
  • Wyniki badań architektonicznych Wieży Piastowskiej w Opolu, typescript in the Archives of the Regional Monument Inspector in Opole,
  • M. Chorowska, Rezydencje średniowieczne na Śląsku. Zamki, pałace, wieże mieszkalne, Wrocław 2003, pp. 32,81,82, fig. 27.
  • T. Kozaczewski, Zamek piastowski na Ostrówku w Opolu, Zeszyty Naukowe Politechniki Wrocławskiej, no. 16, Architektura II, Wrocław 1957, pp. 65-66,
  • W. Dziewulski, Miasto lokacyjne w Opolu w XIII-XIV wieku, (in:) Studia Śląskie, vol.1, 1958,p. 41,
  • U. Zajączkowska, Zamek piastowski w Opolu, Opole 2001.

Upper Silesian District building, currently the Opole Voivodeship Office
Opole

30 minutes

The building is an excellent example of a public utility building erected in Neues Bauen style. The creation of a modernist building in this location required the demolition of the Piast castle, from which only the tower was preserved. The picturesquely situated building plays an important role in the development of urban space: located in one of the main streets in the very heart of the city, it is a dominant feature visible from a wide perspective. It was entered into the register of monuments as the only modernist building in Opole.

History

Around 1928, the president of the Upper Silesian district, Dr Alfons Proske, decided to demolish the Piast Castle on Ostrówek, i.e., the northern part of the Pasieka Island, which was in poor technical condition. Under the influence of protests, the fortified tower which is a symbol of the city was saved and has been preserved to this day. The site formerly occupied by the castle was used for the construction of the headquarters of the Opole district according to a design by architect Friedrich (or Konrad) Lehmann selected for implementation. The design was later changed, among others, in terms of the layout of the southern wings and the position towards the Piast Tower. The work on the construction of the modern office building was interrupted as a result of finding the remnants of the tenth-century Slavic settlement, which required archaeological work. Eventually, the building was completed according to various sources in 1932, 1933 or 1935. In addition to the office of the district, it also housed the apartment of the president of the district (in the eastern part) and the local administration (in the west wing). After World War II, it was the seat of the Provincial National Council, then the Voivodeship Office. In 1957 the crown of the Piast tower was altered, replacing the zinc cone with a masonry spire with an iron-cut Piast eagle. Post-war changes included, among others, the installation of an external glazed lift on the front façade and change in the shape of the windows on the ground floor in the connecting section.

Description

The building is located in the northern part of the Pasieka Island, between the Odra River and Młynówka channel, in Piastowska Street. To the south of the building, there is the Castle Pond which is a remnant of the moat, and next to it is the wooden Icehouse. To the west there is the Piast Tower, behind which there is the Opole Amphitheatre located on the site formerly occupied by an early medieval fortified settlement. On the south side of the building, there is a narrow green belt, adjacent to the pond.

The free-standing modernist building consists of several segments arranged on a broken line. The main part is the seven-storey north wing, which is supported by three rows of steel pillars in the middle part. The southern part of the complex consists of a two-storey wing curved in the form of an arch and located almost perpendicularly to the main wing and connected to it by a connecting section. In the corner between the wings there is the cylindrical Piast Tower, which is a counterweight to the horizontally stretched body. The building has a basement under all of its sections and is covered with flat roofs.

It was erected as a steel timber-frame structure. The walls are made of brick; all rooms are covered with flat ceilings. The façades are covered with ceramic and sandstone tiles, divided by rows of windows in a strip-like arrangement; single windows on the ground floor are round in shape. The floor and pillars in the main corridor are covered with a stone cladding; wooden external blinds have been partially preserved.

Parts of the interior décor, including an operational paternoster lift, have been preserved.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 16-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Schiedlansky G., Die Bau und Kunstdenkmäler des Stadtkreises Oppeln, G. Schiedlansky, Breslau 1939.
  • Störtkuhl B., Moderne Architektur in Schlesien 1900 bis 1939. Baukultur und Politik, Oldenburg 2013, pp. 319-322.
  • Śląsk. Zabytki sztuki w Polsce, collective work, Warsaw 2006, p. 647.
  • Opole. Dzieje i tradycja, Link B., Tarka K., Zajączkowska U. (eds.), Opole 2011, p. 214.

kościół parafialny pw. Świętej Trójcy
Opole

30 minutes

Cathedral Church of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Opole

15 minuts

The cathedral church was built using early Gothic and Gothic forms is one of the most recognisable sites in the old town area of the city of Opole. Significantly altered in the 19th and 20th century, the building has preserved numerous components of the original décor.

History

The earliest mentions of the church of the Holy Cross in Opole date back to 1204, when a bishop of Wrocław handed over the relics of the Holy Cross. In 1227, the church was raised to the rank of collegiate church (collegiate chapter existed until 1810), and the construction of a larger church began around the middle of the 13th century. In 1295, the collegiate church was consecrated and the rank of parish church was re-established (the Church on the Hill (Na Górce) served as a parish church during the construction).

A new chancel and new sacristy were built around the half of the 15th century, and in the 15th and 16th century the main body was extended by the chapels of the Holy Trinity (currently the Piast Chapel), St. Hedwig and St. Anne. Over the years, works on the church and its fittings included constructing a large sacristy, replacing the roof cladding, adjusting the buttresses, redesigning the interior in the Baroque and Gothic Revival style. Recent significant works took place in the late 19th and early 20th century when the exterior façades were altered and the building was extended by adding towers, and in the 1960s when sgraffiti and stained glass windows in the chancel were made.

Description

The cathedral church was erected north of the built-up area of the Market Square, in the vicinity of the city fortifications. It is located in the middle of a trapezoid square surrounded by a masonry fence with an arcaded gate to the south. It is closed off by Książąt Opolskich Street to the east and Katedralna Street to the south.

The cathedral is oriented towards the east, erected as a three-aisle hall church with a chancel closed off on three sides and three-sided apses closing off the side aisles. The main body of the church is buttresses, consists of six bays with a non-separated chancel. To the west, there are two slender towers which are quadrangular on the ground floor and octagonal on the upper storeys. Two sacristies, the Piast chapel (to the south), and the chapel of St. Hedwig and St. Anne (to the north) were fitted in the spaces between the buttresses.

The church is made of brick and rests on a tall stone base course. Its façades are articulated vertically with buttresses and splayed plastered pointed-arch window openings. The horizontal articulation is provided by a frieze running along the top of the walls of the chapels and consisting of plastered arcaded blind windows. Cast iron and stone plaques with epitaphs are on the southern and eastern side of the façades.

The main body of the church is covered with a gable roof; the chancel and apses of the side aisles are covered with a common multi-faceted roof. The chapels and sacristies are topped with shed roofs, and the towers with bulbous cupolas with lanterns.

The west façade is triaxial. The main body surmounted by a triangular gable with pointed-arch blind windows and flanked by towers is located in the central axis. On the ground floor, there is a neo-Gothic vestibule with a pointed-arch portal. The corner of the towers are supported by tall triple-stepped buttresses. The decoration and articulation of the south and north façades are similar and were harmonised during renovation that took place in the late 19th and 20th century. On the ground floor of the southern tower, there is an arcaded niche holding a sculptural group depicting Christ in the Gethsemane (early 20th c.). The east façade is seven-axial with a symmetrical layout and richly profiled crowning cornice.

The central aisle is slightly wider than the side aisles and more strongly projecting to the east. It was separated from the side aisles by pointed-arch arcades, and the part of the chancel was accentuated by raising the floor. The main and side aisles are covered with stellar vaults. The west bay of the body of the church houses a choir gallery, and the ground floor of the northern tower is occupied by a baptistery.

The fittings of the church date back to various periods, starting from a Gothic baptismal font and the painting of Our Lady of Piekary, through the Late Gothic triptychs, Late Baroque main altar and side altars, to the Classicist pulpit (1805) and twentieth-century stained glass windows. In addition, the church features a group of epitaphs and stone tombstones, including the tombstone of Duke John the Good (1532).

The historic building is open to visitors.

compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 12-11-2015.

Bibliography

  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII, Województwo opolskie, issue 11: Miasto Opole i powiat opolski, T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki (eds.), Warsaw 1968, pp. 3-13.
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury- kościół katedralny pw. Świętego Krzyża w Opolu, prepared by Dariusz Stoces, PG, 2005, Archives of the Voivodeship Monuments Protection Office in Opole

mury obronne
Opole

15 minuts

szpital św. Aleksego, ob. siedziba Caritas
Opole

15 minuts

kaplica szpitalna pw. św. Aleksego
Opole

15 minuts

wieża zamku górnego z fragmentem murów
Opole

15 minuts

Monastery building, former hospital, currently the Collegium Maius of the University
Opole

30 minutes

The history of the hill is traditionally associated with the figure of St. Adalbert, who in 984 was supposed to come to Opole and baptise converted inhabitants of Opole. This place was later occupied by a well of St. Adalbert, visible in F. Werner's painting, church and monastery. The later history of the Dominican monastery, then a hospital and finally a university building are strongly linked to the history and everyday life of the city. The complex is a dominant feature in the panorama of the city.

History

The first wooden monastery founded by Duke Bolko I was constructed in 1295-1301 (according to other sources — after 1254). In the first half of the 13th century, fragments of the defensive wall were used for the construction a masonry monastery, which underwent alterations in 1399. In 1530, the Dominicans were removed from the monastery, and the condition of the abandoned building deteriorated. After being regained by the order in 1614, renovation work on the monastery continued for several years and new walls were erected. In the 17th century, the monastery was destroyed, and the friars moved to the nearby castle called "Na Górce". In 1701-1708, the entire monastery complex was thoroughly reconstructed and baroqueized; it was again destroyed the great fire of the city in 1739.

The F. Werner's painting from around 1750 shows three monastery wings together with a church formed a quadrangle with a small garth in the middle. At the corner of the south wing, there was the chapel of St. Adalbert (number of entry: 756/64), the courtyard was occupied by a well, and on the southern side of the monastery there was a four-quarter garden surrounded by a wall. After secularisation in 1811, the monastery building was separated from the church by bricking up the passages connecting them and put into use as offices and flats. In 1845, it was bought by Fr. Karl Alois Gaerth and intended to serve as a municipal hospital, and gradually altered: the western and southern wings were demolished (the wings were rebuilt in 1865, and additionally extended to the west in 1885), among others. In 1893-1894, the present front part of the building located to the east of the old buildings was built on the site formerly occupied by a moat. The part is complex. In 1945, the structure was partially destroyed by fire and plundered; in the post-war years it was reconstructed and used as a hospital. It was in poor technical condition when it was taken over by the University of Opole in 1996. Since 2002, after reconstruction and modernisation, it has served as the seat of the rectorate of the University of Opole.

Description

The former Dominican monastery complex is located in the north-eastern part of the city centre, near the line of the former town fortifications, on the tallest hill in the old town. To the west, the building complex can be accessed by stairs which are an extension of Świętego Wojciecha Street connecting the Market Square to the Small Market Square (Mały Rynek). To the east, there is the main entrance to the CM, and in front of it there is Copernicus Square. Green areas surrounding the monastery complex are used for the exhibition of sculptures from the surrounding neglected palaces (including, but not limited to, Baroque depiction of four seasons sculpted by Heinrich Hartmann originating from Biestrzykowice, Marian column moved from Regulice north of the Nysa river, and monumental sculpture of St. Christopher with Child from the palace in Kopice) and depicting figures from the world of art and culture. Nearby is a neo-Gothic orphanage building (currently the Collegium Minus of the University of Opole), Piast tower and Jesuit College (currently the Museum of Opole Silesia).

The monastery buildings were erected on limestone, on shallow foundations, with the oldest sections made of stone. Walls in the historic part are made of solid brick. The rooms are covered with segmental vaults (mainly in the basement) and groin vaults. Most rooms were formerly topped with wooden and Klein ceilings — now modernised.

The present form of the multiple-wing building has been shaped by subsequent redevelopments (mainly in the second half of the 19th century) and modernisation in the later 20th century. The oldest Baroque wing is adjacent to the chancel, currently a parish church, and along with the almost perpendicular west wing is a reconstruction of the outline of the former garth. The preserved original components of the former monastery include a Dominican refectory ornamented with painted Late Baroque decorations depicting the Holy Trinity, guardian angel, and St. Michael the Archangel, which currently serves as a room. The front wing erected in 1893-1894 consists of two four-storey solids with picturesque tower projections, with façades composed using Romanesque Revival, Classicist and Baroque Revival forms. In 1996-2001, it extended upwards by adding a glass superstructure over the line of attic windows.

The structure is open to the public from the outside; viewing of the interior is possible during the classes at the University of Opole.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 17-06-2014.

Bibliography

  • Schidlausky G., Hartmann R., Eberle K., DieBau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Stadtkreises Oppeln, Breslau 1939, p. 105.
  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, woj. opolskie, miasto Opole i pow. opolski, Vol. VII, issue 11, pp. 21-28.
  • Nicieja S.S., Wzgórze Uniwersyteckie w Opolu, ludzie i zabytki, fakty i legendy, Opole 2008.
  • Opracowania z archiwum WUOZ w Opolu
  • Opole. Dzieje i tradycja, Link B., Tarka K., Zajączkowska U. (eds.), Opole 2011.

Parish Church of Our Lady of Sorrows and St. Adalbert, called the Church on the Hill
Opole

15 minuts

Built on the hill, the Church of Our Lady of Sorrows and St. Adalbert of Gothic provenance is one of the landmarks in the old town area of the city, hence the name "Church on the Hill" (Polish: Kościół Na Górce). The interior fittings of the church date back to various periods ranging from Gothic, through Baroque, to contemporary works of art.

History

The construction of the church on the hill is associated with the figure of St. Adalbert who was preaching there in the 10th century. Since 1254, the church has been raised to the rank of a parish church (in 1295, there rights were transferred to the Collegiate Church of the Holy Cross). According to some sources, the construction of a monastery for the Dominicans, to whom the church on the hill was transferred, began in 1295. The construction of a masonry church began in the early 14th century, and its consecration took place in 1361. The church was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, Sts. George, Adalbert, Dominic and Anne. In 1430, the church was again consecrated most probably because of the construction of the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Częstochowa.

In the 16th and 17th century, the friars abandoned the church and the monastery several times. There were also fires and subsequent work on the reconstruction of the church. The early 18th century saw its thorough renovation involving, among others, baroquisation of the interior and probably construction of the tower over the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Częstochowa.

In 1811, the monastery buildings were transformed into a hospital and warehouse, and the church was used until 1820 as a lower secondary school church, and then as a pastoral church. Another full-scale renovation to the church took place in 1931-1938 and involved simplifying the west façade.

Description

The Church of Our Lady of Sorrows and St. Adalbert was erected on a limestone slope in the immediate vicinity of the old town walls, east of the Market Square buildings. To the south-east of it there are former monastery buildings, now occupied by the University of Opole, and to the north-west the church adjoins a former cemetery.

It is oriented towards the east, built as a three-aisle basilica with an elongated four-bay buttressed chancel closed off on three sides. The chancel adjoins a quadrangular sacristy with an oratory on the upper storey to the south and the chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Częstochowa closed off on three sides to the north. The body of the church is preceded by semi-elliptical stairs to the west and adjoins porches to the north and south.

The church is built of brick, on a base course used to even out the difference in the height of the area. The body of the church and the chancel are covered with a gable roof with eyelid dormers over the nave. The chapel of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Częstochowa is surmounted by a three-storey octagonal tower covered with a bulbous cupola with a lantern.

The façades of the church are smoothly plastered with frame decoration in the tower and simplified decoration of the western façade with pilasters flanking the central axis and an arcaded frieze in its finial. In addition, the façades are articulated with buttresses (in the chancel and chapel) and window openings, including pointed-arch openings with reconstructed tracery and profiled mullions in the chancel and round-arched openings in the body of the church.

The chancel is covered with a barrel vault with lunettes decorated with painted plafonds (E. Fey), the central and southern aisle with groin vaults separated by arches, while the northern aisle with a cross-ribbed vault. The chancel walls are partitioned with pilasters. The entrance to the chapel Blessed Virgin Mary of Częstochowa was framed by a Baroque portal with paintings and modern grillwork (Marian Nowak) placed therein. In the western bay of the main aisle, there is an overhanging choir gallery with a stucco sill. The interior décor complements fittings dating, among others, from the period of baroquisation of the church, including the main altar, regency side altars and pulpit, set of paintings and sculptures from the 18th and 19th century, and nineteenth-century pipe organ casing, into which Baroque sculptures were incorporated.

The building is open to visitors.

compiled by Aleksandra Ziółkowska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Opole, 04-11-2015.

Bibliography

  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, vol. VII, Województwo opolskie, issue 11: Miasto Opole i powiat opolski, T. Chrzanowski, M. Kornecki (eds.), Warsaw 1968, pp. 21-26.
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury- kościół podominikański pw. Matki Boskiej Bolesnej i św. Wojciecha - „Na Górce”, prepared by Dariusz Stoces, PG, 2005, Archives of the Voivodeship Monuments Protection Office in Opole

Chapel of St. Adalbert
Opole

15 minuts

The chapel is part of the former Dominican monastery complex situated on a limestone hill overlooking the historical centre of Opole. Traditionally, it is associated with the stay of St. Adalbert in Opole in 984.

History

The chapel was erected probably using the walls of the thirteenth-century fortified tower and was consecrated in 1361. In 1663, the chapel was extended upwards using the Gothic foundations. At that time, it was situated at the corner of the short western wing of the Dominican monastery, extending beyond the quadrangular monastery complex. The wing was built anew in 1865 and then extended in 1885 so that the chapel is now located in 2/3 of its length and is accessible from its interior. Over the years, the chapel was damaged by fires and was renovated several times. The chapel was burned in 1945; after the war it was converted into a storage room for the hospital in the former monastery. At the beginning of this century, the building gradually falling into ruin was restored and is now part of the Museum of the University of Opole.

Description

The chapel is linked with the former Dominican monastery complex located in the south-eastern part of the city centre, on the tallest hill in the old town (so-called Wzgórze Wojciechowe (Adalbert's Hill), Wzgórze Klasztorne (Monastery Hill), Wzgórze Zamkowe (Castle Hill), currently Wzgórze Uniwersyteckie (University Hill)). The northern side of the chapel adjoins the south-western wing of the Collegium Maius of the University of Opole.

The small building was built of brick on stone foundations. It is a single-space structure on a floor plan which approximates the shape of a rectangle. Significantly thick walls in the corners were additionally reinforced with buttresses and a stone plinth. The chapel is surmounted by a low square superstructure which is crowned with a round lantern with windows, covered with a cupola. The walls of the interior covered with a sail vault feature arcades and niches terminating in semicircular arches. The fixtures and fittings, i.e., a Baroque altar and statues in the niches, known from archival photographs have not survived.

The structure is open to the public from the outside; viewing of the interior of the chapel is possible during the opening hours of the Museum of the University of Opole.

compiled by Ewa Kalbarczyk-Klak, National Heritage Board of Poland, Regional Branch in Opole, 18-06-2014.

Bibliography

  • Schidlausky G., Hartmann R., Eberle K., DieBau-und Kunstdenkmäler des Stadtkreises Oppeln, Breslau 1939, p. 105.
  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, woj. opolskie, miasto Opole i pow. opolski, Vol. VII, issue 11, pp. 21-28.
  • Nicieja S.S., Wzgórze Uniwersyteckie w Opolu, ludzie i zabytki, fakty i legendy, Opole 2008.
  • Publication from the archives of the Voivodeship Monuments Protection Office in Opole.
  • Opole. Dzieje i tradycja, Link B., Tarka K., Zajączkowska U. (eds.), Opole 2011.

kolegium jezuickie, ob. Muzeum Śląska Opolskiego
Opole

two hours

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