Kościoły ryglowe pogranicza Kaszub i Krajny
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Beata Dygulska

Kościoły ryglowe pogranicza Kaszub i Krajny

13

two days

pomorskie

Parish Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Czarne

30 minutes

The church is an example of an eighteenth-century sacred building, built using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. It is characterised by a well-preserved architectural form and valuable eighteenth-century furnishings.

History

The preserved documents indicate that the church in Czarne existed as early as in 1395 and was a filial church of the parish in Sokole. In 1550, the church was taken over by Protestant, and then in 1596 again returned to Catholics. In 1617, it became a parish church and the seat of a deanery. In 1686, the deanery was liquidated because of a small number of the faithful. The church in Czarne was repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt. The first church was destroyed, and then rebuilt in 1645-1646. Then, it was destroyed by fire in 1653 and again erected in 1673. After another fire, the church was reconstructed in 1720-1721. The last destructive fire devastated the building in 1755. The building that has been preserved to this day was built in 1756 (as evidenced by the dates of construction on the tower flag: 1673, 1710 i 1756). The church underwent complete renovation between 2010 and 2012.

Description

It is situated in the north-western part of the town. The church is oriented. It is located on a plot facing A. Mickiewicza Street to the north, Kościelna Street to the east, T. Kościuszki Street to the south, and neighbours the buildings in Cicha Street to the west. The churchyard was originally used as a graveyard, of which two gravestones has been preserved to this day. The plot boasts single old-growth trees.

The church is a half-timbered structure with brick infills, and is not covered with plaster. The roof is clad with wood shingles. The building was erected on a rectangular floor plan and features a chancel closed off on three sides. It was extended by two annexes: a chancel-sacristy to the north and a porch to the south of the nave. The body of the church is fragmented and consists of nave, narrower and lower chancel, two small annexes, and a two-storey tower embedded in the nave to the west. The nave of the church is covered with gable roof, the chancel with a roof consisting of five sections, the annexes with mono-pitched roofs, and the tower with a bulbous dome with a lantern.

The façades are pierced by window openings topped by segmental arches; the east wall of the chancel has a round window. A profiled cornice stretches under the eaves. The clearly apparent structure of the building featuring a dense checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams and the colours of wood contrasted with plastered infills serve as a decoration.

The church features lavish Baroque and Rococo interior fittings dating from the 18th century: gallery, main altar with a cordovan antependium, ambo, baptismal font, confessional, and doors from the chancel to the sacristy and from the sacristy to the ambo. In addition, the porch is fitted with a granite stoup from the 15th century (uncertain dating).

The monument is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 26-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s. 24-25
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury. Kościół rzym.-kat. Pw. Wniebowzięcia NMP, opr. D. Cieślik,1999, Archiwum NID

transport time to the next site

6 min

Kościół fil. pw. św. Andrzeja Apostoła
Nadziejewo

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

7 min

Filial Church of Our Lady of Częstochowa
Raciniewo

15 minuts

It is an example of a half-timbered seventeenth-century church built using traditional construction technology common to rural religious buildings in Pomerania between the 16th century and the 19th century.

History

The first church in Raciniewo was Catholic. After the Reformation, it was taken over by Evangelicals. The first mention of the church as a filial church of the parish of Czarne was in the records of 1617. Since 1946, it has served as Catholic church and a filial church of the parish of Bińcze. The current building was erected in 1680. According to tradition, it was built in a single night (probably only the timber frame structure).

Description

The church is located on the north-eastern edge of the village, on a hill. It can be accessed by a number of steps. The building is adjoined by a free-standing bell tower. The church plot is partly wooded and boasts the relics of the former graveyard. The adjacent plot is occupied by a contemporary graveyard.

The main body of the church is a half-timbered structure with brick infills, covered with plaster; the west façade was reconstructed using brick. Both gables of the main body are covered with wooden boards. The walls were covered with an additionally layer of bricks on the inside in 2001. The tower features a post-and-beam structure covered with wooden boards. The sacristy is made of brick. The building was erected on a rectangular floor plan and features a single-space layout without a separate chancel. The main body is cuboidal in shape and covered with a gable roof. A tower was incorporated in the ceiling of the nave on the west side and covered with an octagonal dome with an orifice, surmounted by a spire with a flag. A small sacristy, which was built on the floor plan of a rectangle enclosed on three sides to the east and covered with a roof consisting of five sections, was added to the east façade of the main body. The main entrance to the church is located on the west façade, a side entrance (directly to the nave) on the south façade. The façades of the main body feature an exposed wall structure characterised by checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams, which are contrasted with infills covered with plaster. Window and door woodwork is contemporary.

The church interior boasts a western gallery and side galleries, reaching up to 1/3 of the length of the wall of the nave. The preserved original furnishings include a Baroque altar from the 17th c. (modern painting) and pews and confessionals from the 18th-19th c.

The monument is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 17-11-2015.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977;
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s. 64

transport time to the next site

6 min

Kościół parafilany pw. Świętej Rodziny
Bińcze

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

5 min

Filial church of St Francis of Assisi
Olszanowo

15 minuts

The church is an example of a rural sacred building. It was erected using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. Built in the 17th century, it is one of the oldest buildings of that kind in Pomerania.

History

The village was first mentioned in the records of 1376. The oldest information about a church, a Protestant one, comes from the 2nd half of the 16th century. The present church was erected before 1688. In the late 17th century, Olszanowo was a centre of a large parish. In 1947, the church was taken over by Catholics. Presently, it is a filial church of the parish in Gwieździna.

Description

The church is located in the southern part of the village, on a hill, on the north-west side of the road. The church is oriented. In the immediate vicinity of the church, there are green areas (meadows, wastelands, woodlots), and further - village buildings. The church plot is surrounded by a concrete wall. On the area of the property, there are single old trees - the remains of the border plants. The churchyard was originally used as a graveyard (no gravestones have been preserved to this day).

The body of the church is a half-timbered structure with brick infills, and is covered with plaster. The tower features a post-and-beam structure covered with weatherboards. The eastern gable is weatherboarded in a herringbone pattern. The building was erected on a rectangular floor plan and features a single-space layout without a separated chancel. The church is cuboidal in shape. Its western section features a tower (embedded in the nave). From the south, there is an annex, that is a sacristy from 1985. The nave of the church is covered with gable roof, and the tower is topped with a bulbous dome with a lantern. The entrance to the building is in the western façade. Window openings feature semi-circular arches in the top sections. The façades are not adorned with any architectural detail; the clearly exposed structure of the building featuring a checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams and the colours of wood contrasted with plastered infills serve as a decoration.

In the interior, there is a beamed ceiling with a crown moulding and fibreboard counter ceilings. The Baroque pulpit from the 17th-18th century, the Rococo altar from the 18th century, and the bell from 1781 are part of the more important historical fittings.

The church is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 04-12-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977.
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s.54.

transport time to the next site

9 min

Parish Church of St Martin the Bishop
Gwieździn

15 minuts

The church is an example of a rural eighteenth-century sacred building, built using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. It is characterised by a well-preserved architectural form and valuable eighteenth-century furnishings.

History

The first mention of the parish and the church in Gwieździn dates back to 1376. During the religious riots in the late 16th and early 17th century, the church was incorporated into the Parish of Przechlewo, then in 1760 it again became an independent parish. During the Counter-Reformation, Gwieździn was a place of activity of the Jesuits of Chojnice. The present church was built in 1754. In 1826, the church underwent extensions, which involved extending the nave by 10 m towards the west and erecting a tower. After World War 2, the church was initially a filial church of the Parish of Rzeczenica; since 1967, it has been an independent parish.

Description

The church is located in the centre of the village, in the southern part of the village square. The church is oriented. The church plot has the shape of an irregular pentagon and is fenced with a wall. The plot is also occupied by a graveyard, which features the preserved original gravestones dating from 1885 and the first half of the 19th century. The site also boasts old-growth trees. A modern free-standing bell tower featuring a metal structure adjoins the west façade of the church. To the north, the church plot borders on the parcel occupied by a priests' house.

The eastern part, including about half of the nave, chancel, sacristy, and porch, feature a post-and-plank structure. The western part of the nave is a post-and-beam structure, while the tower features a post-and-frame structure. The entire building was covered with weatherboards.

The building was erected on the floor plan of an elongated rectangle and has a separate chancel enclosed on three sides. The sacristy adjoins the north façade of the chancel, whereas the porch is located to the south façade of the nave. The body of the church is fragmented and consists of nave, narrower and lower chancel, two small annexes, and a tower embedded in the nave to the west. The nave of the church is covered with gable roof, the chancel with a roof consisting of five sections, the sacristy a with shed roof, and the porch with a gable roof. The tower is surmounted by a slender octagonal dome with a wide orifice at the bottom, which is topped by a roof consisting of eight sections. The roof of the main body is clad with roof tiles, whereas the tower with wood shingles.

The façade feature modest decorations in the form of a profiled cornice below the eaves and window and door surrounds. All openings are surmounted by segmental arches. The surrounds were designed in the Baroque style and adorned with decorative side sections and a keystone. The exterior doors are original; the windows were replaced, but modeled on the original. The eastern façade of the chancel features a wooden sculpture of Christ on the Cross dating from the 17th century.

The interior is covered with a beamed ceiling with boards and crown mouldings attached above the exposed beams. The preserved Baroque and Rococo furnishings from the 18th century include: gallery with paintings on the balustrade, main altar, pulpit, baptismal font, and crucifix on the rood beam. The windows feature reproductions of Baroque statues, the originals of which are now in the museum in Człuchów. In addition, the church is fitted with a bell from the 15th century, which is located in the exterior bell tower.

The historic building is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 29-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977.
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s.39-40
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury. Kościół rzym.-kat. p.w. św. Marcina Biskupa, opr. D. Cieślik,1999, Archiwum NID

transport time to the next site

8 min

kościół filialny pw. św. Jakuba Apostoła
Krępsk

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

15 min

kościół parafialny pw. św. Anny
Przechlewo

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

20 min

kościół parafialny pw. Świętej Trójcy
Polnica

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

29 min

kościół filialny pw. św. Wawrzyńca
Strzeczona

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

13 min

Filial Church of Saints Peter and Paul the Apostles
Cierznie

15 minuts

The church is an example of a rural eighteenth-century sacred building, built using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. As one of the few in the region, the church was always in possession of Catholics.

History

The village of Cierznie was awarded a charter granting rights to the settlement in 1351. The first mention of a parish in the village dates back to the mid-16th century. In the 17th century, after the Polish-Swedish wars, Cierznie was deserted for a long time. Probably at that time, the church became a filial church of the Uniechowo parish and continues to serve this function today. The present-day church was built in 1785. Between 1975 and 1980, the church was partially modified, which involved the demolition of a half-timbered sacristy and construction of a new sacristy and a gallery.

Description

The church is located in the centre of the village, on the village square. It is oriented. The churchyard was originally used as a graveyard (no gravestones have been preserved to this day). Currently, the plot is enclosed with a fence. It boasts single old-growth trees, which are the remains of the former border plants. The north-eastern corner of the plot features a free-standing wooden bell tower.

The body of the church is a half-timbered structure with brick infills, and is covered with plaster. The tower features a post-and-beam structure covered with weatherboards. The building is erected on a rectangular floor plan, features a single interior space and an altar section closed off on three sides. The church is cuboidal in shape. Its western section features a tower (embedded in the nave). The nave is covered with a gable roof, the altar section with a gable roof with a hip end, whereas the tower is topped by a Baroque three-storey bulbous dome with a lantern. The main entrance to the building is located on the west façade, and the side entrance on the south façade. The south façade is pierced by a door dating back to the second half of the 18th century (or later), with planks stacked in the shape of a rhombus and a relief plaque.

The window openings in the façades are surmounted by semicircular arches. The façades are not adorned with any special decorations; however, the clearly apparent structure of the building featuring a dense checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams and the colours of wood contrasted with plastered infills serve as a decoration.

The interior of the church is predominantly modern. The historic furnishings include 4 paintings from 1758 (in a rococo framework), nineteenth-century painting, confessional and pews.

The historic monument is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 24-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977.
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s.20
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury. Kościół rzym.-kat. filialny p.w. św. Piotra i Pawła, opr. D. Cieślik,1993, Archiwum NID

transport time to the next site

9 min

Parish Church of Christ the King
Krzemieniewo

15 minuts

The church is an example of a rural eighteenth-century sacred building, built using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. The building is characterised by a relatively rare form of the tower in Pomerania. What makes the tower of particular interest is that it was added to the nave and its walls taper towards the top.

History

The village of Krzemieniewo was chartered in 1354. The church was first mentioned in records of 1410. In the second half of the 16th century, Krzemieniewo had a Protestant church, which was presumably using the existing church building. In the 19th century, the church belonged to the Evangelical Parish of Lędyczek. In 1930, it was incorporated into the newly established Parish of Domisław. After World War 2, the church was taken over by Catholis. Originally, it belonged to the Parish of Uniechowo, and then the Parish of Bińcze. Today, it is an independent parish.

The exact date of construction of the present-day church is not known. It was probably built in the second half of the 18th century and altered in the 19th century. In the 1970s, part of the building underwent alterations. The alterations involved replacing the half-timbered structure of the lower sections of the walls with a masonry structure, altering the layout and shape of some window openings. The side (north) gallery was removed from the interior. Between 2001 and 2009, the church underwent thorough maintenance, which resulted in the restoration of the original forms of the wall and windows. However, at the same time, the clay infills preserved in some sections was replaced with brick infills. Moreover, the half-timbered sacristy was demolished and replaced with a new masonry one.

Description

The church is located in the centre of the village and in the central part of the village square. The structure is oriented. The church plot has the shape of an irregular pentagon. It adjoins a road to the west and north, and a green area to the east and south. A rectory is situated to the north of the church, on the opposite side of the road. The boundaries of the plot are marked with trees.

The nave of the church is a half-timbered structure with brick infills, and is covered with plaster. The tower and the side annexes feature a post-and-beam structure covered with weatherboards. The building was erected on a rectangular floor plan, divided into two parts. On the east side is a single-space nave, without a separate chancel. The south façade of the nave adjoins a modern brick sacristy. On the west side is the single-space interior of the tower, together with the adjacent annexes (currently, the half-timbered walls between the tower and annexes are devoid of infill components). The body of the church is compact. The nave is cuboid in shape and covered with a gable roof. The tower is set directly on the ground, framed by annexes to the south, west and north, which are joined with the main body of the church. The annexes are covered with mono-pitched roofs. The walls of the tower taper towards the top. The tower is surmounted by an octagonal dome, with an orifice at the bottom and an octagonal roof at the top.

The window openings in the façade are rectangular. The façade are not adorned with any decorations; however, the clearly apparent structure of the building featuring a checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams and the colours of wood contrasted with plastered infills serve as a decoration.

The interior is covered with an exposed beamed ceiling with angle braces adjacent to the walls. The preserved historic furnishings of the church only include the western gallery from the 18th century and bells from 1607 and 1925.

The monument is open to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compiled by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 30-09-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977.
  • Fryda M., Kościoły Człuchowa i okolicy, Człuchów 1995, s.45
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytku architektury. Kościół rzym.-kat. filialny p.w. Chrystusa króla, opr. D. Cieślik,1993, Archiwum NID

transport time to the next site

5 min

Filial church of St Judas Thaddeus
Sierpowo

15 minuts

The church is an example of a rural sacred building, erected using the traditional half-timbered construction technique. Built in the 17th century, it is one of the oldest buildings of that kind in Pomerania.

History

The church was erected in 1668.

Description

The church is located in the eastern part of the village, on the southern side of the main country road. It is oriented. The church plot is rectangular and surrounded with fence. Along the eastern, southern, and western border of the plot there are lines of trees. The church area functioned as a cemetery, of which 2 cast iron grave crosses from 1869 have survived. The plot neighbours farms.

The body of the church is a half-timbered structure with plastered brick infills. The tower features a post-and-beam structure and is covered with weatherboards. The building was erected on a rectangular floor plan divided into two parts: 1) from the west there is the ground floor of the tower, with a corridor in the middle and two side annexes, 2) from the east there is a single-space nave, without a separated chancel. The nave is covered with a gable roof. The tower was built on soil and features walls that taper towards the top. It is topped with a slender, octagonal tented roof with an orifice. On the ground floor, on both sides of the tower, there are two annexes, covered with mono-pitched roofs. The façades and the roofs of the annexes merge with the façades and the roofs of the nave body (the tower looks as if it was raising from the nave body). The roof and the tented roof are covered with planked boards. The groove of the tented roof is adorned with fretwork at the bottom. The main entrance to the building is situated in the western façade, and the side entrance is situated in the southern façade. In the western façade, on both sides of the main entrance, there is small door to the annexes of the tower. Window openings are rectangular. The façades are not adorned with any architectural detail; the clearly apparent and dense structure of the building featuring a checkerboard arrangement of posts and beams and the colours of wood contrasted with plastered infills serve as a decoration.

The interior features a beamed ceiling with counter-ceilings made of wooden boards and a crown moulding. The fixtures and fittings are modern, except for the gallery from the 18th century (covered with weatherboards at a later date).

The historic monument is accessible to visitors. Viewing of the church is possible directly before and after services.

compield by Beata Dygulska, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 01-12-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sadkowski T., Drewniana architektura sakralna na Pomorzu Gdańskim w XVIII-XX w., Gdańsk 1977.

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