DZIEDZICTWO KALISZA W WIELOKULTUROWEJ ODSŁONIE
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Teresa Palacz

DZIEDZICTWO KALISZA W WIELOKULTUROWEJ ODSŁONIE

11

one day

wielkopolskie

Grodzisko
Kalisz

two hours

transport time to the next site

12 min

9 min

Katedra pw. św. Mikołaja z d. klasztorem kanoników lateraneńskich
Kalisz

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

3 min

7 min

The Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Kalisz

30 minutes

The Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (also known as the Sanctuary of St Joseph) is the historic collegiate church of the city of Kalisz, founded back in 1359. Along with the Franciscan church and the church of St Nicholas, it remains one of the oldest churches in the city. In 1978, Pope John Paul II elevated it to the rank of a Minor Basilica. Among the many ecclesiastical buildings in Kalisz, this church is distinguished by its monumental design and architectural beauty. The church remained linked with the city from the 13th century onwards, being the site of the cult of the Holy Family. In addition, the basilica in Kalisz remains the most significant centre of the cult of St Joseph (the patron of families) in the country.

History

The original, Gothic church was erected before 1359; it was funded by archbishop Jarosław Bogoria Skotnicki, even though it is suspected that its construction has begun at a much earlier date. The funds provided by the archbishop facilitated the construction of many outstanding buildings, including the Gothic cathedral in Gniezno, the collegiate church and the castle in Uniejów.

In 1583, the old bishop’s palace was restored and donated to the Jesuit order.

In 1609, the roof of the church was destroyed during a fire.

In 1783, the inexpert handling of the process of extension of the former archbishop’s mansion and other Jesuit buildings located alongside the church resulted in a construction disaster. The southern nave and chapels as well as the façade of the church have all collapsed in the process. Only the chancel and the sacristy remained intact.

In years 1790-1792, the church was rebuilt and extended through the addition of a single bay, designed in the fashionable Late Baroque style. Most of the stylistic changes incorporating the elements of this style applied to the tower and the interior decor. The architect responsible for the redesign remains unknown. The former collegiate church in Chocz and the parish churches in Błaszki and Tursk are attributed to the same designers due to the striking similarity of their appearance. The chapel dedicated to St Joseph was added on the extension of the southern nave; in 1831, the chapel received its decorative wall paintings. A tower was also added during the period in question

Later on, somewhere around the year 1820, a belfry, designed in the Classicist style, was erected next to the church. The architect responsible for the design of the belfry was Sylwester Szpilowski.

In years 1925-26, the tower was reconstructed following the damage which it sustained as a result of the clashes which took place in the city of Kalisz in 1914. The architect responsible for the reconstruction of the tower was W. Wardęski.

In 1948, the tower’s cupola was reconstructed, having suffered extensive damage in 1945.

Description

Kalisz is the oldest city in Poland, mentioned in the works of Claudius Ptolemy written in the second half of the 2nd century, located at the eastern edge of the Kalisz Upland, by the Prosna river. The first traces of human habitation here date back to the 8th century B.C., with the first fortified settlement in Zawodzie having been built back in the 10th century. The famous amber trial led through the city of Kalisz. The new city of Kalisz was founded on its current site by duke Bolesław the Pious around the year 1257. The city was founded at the junction of crucial trading routes and has always been the second-most significant city in Greater Poland, with only Poznań surpassing it in terms of both importance and size. It was here, for example, that Casimir the Great signed the “everlasting” peace treaty with the Teutonic Order. After 1793, the city was incorporated into the Prussian Partition, while in 1815 it found itself within the Russian territory, serving as the centre of the governorate. In the 19th century, the textile industry began to flourish in the city of Kalisz. Having sustained heavy losses in the early days of World War I, the city has managed to rise from the ashes during the interwar period. Famous Poles who had their roots in the city of Kalisz included the poet Adam Asnyk, the illustrator and graphic designer Tadeusz Kulisiewicz, the renowned traveller Stefan Szolc-Rogoziński as well as the Polish president Stanisław Wojciechowski.

In 1359, the church of the Blessed Virgin Mary attained the status of a collegiate church and was formally designated as the seat of both the chapter and the archdeacon. Archbishop Bogoria Skotnicki built his mansion next to the church; the building was positioned right in front of the front gable end of the collegiate church so that one could walk directly from the mansion’s porch to the choir gallery of the church. The archbishop lived at the mansion from 1374 right until his death in 1376. The church was only consecrated in 1445.

Today, the church remains an example of the Late Baroque style, with a Gothic chancel and sacristy. The chancel is oriented towards the northeast. The building is a brick structure with plastered façades; its main body follows a three-nave basilica layout with a quadrangular tower projecting from its front façade. The nave of the church, built on a rectangular floor plan and following a four-bay layout, was originally a Gothic structure the floor plan of which was almost square in shape. The chancel, slightly narrower than the nave, is rectangular in shape and follows a two-bay layout. The sacristy is positioned at the extension of the northern nave, while the octagonal chapel of St Joseph forms an extension of the southern nave. The porch is located in the ground-floor section of the tower. Fragments of the preserved Gothic foundations of the original, western façade of the church can still be seen in the basement of the Chapel of Gratitude and Martyrdom, which is a tangible proof that the church was extended following its reconstruction in years 1790-92. The western façade of the church, framed with pilasters, features an avant-corps projecting from its axis, flanked by volute-shaped fractables. The window openings are rectangular, topped with semicircular arches. Small, oval windows pierce the upper sections of the gable walls of the side naves. The main entrance features a faux-panelled decorative double door dating back to 1790.

The main nave features a barrel vault supported by a series of arches, flowing seamlessly onto the pilaster capitals, while the side naves features sail vaults, also supported by arches. The chancel, on the other hand, features a Late Gothic lierne vault with two keystones and supports; the sacristy features a stellar vault. The chapel of St Joseph features a cupola ceiling consisting of four sections, resting upon supporting arches and adorned with painted decorations dating back to 1831, depicting various scenes from the Old Testament. The side altarpieces, the altarpiece in the chapel of St Joseph as well as the pulpit, the pipe organ casing and the pews feature both Late Baroque and Rococo ornamentation. The most valuable artifact contained in the basilica’s interior is the painting of the Holy Family, painted on canvas and considered to be a miraculous image from the late 18th century, when it was adorned with papal crowns. With its immense size (1.5 x 2.5 metres) and its captivating imagery featuring the Holy Family against the background of a typical Polish town, the painting left all those who saw it with a feeling of astonishment and awe. A dove symbolising the Holy Ghost as well as God the Father with outspread arms seem to hover above the figures depicted on the canvas, accompanied by an inscription which says, “Go Thou to Joseph”. One is led to believe that the painting in fact portrays the return of the 12-year-old Jesus, the Virgin Mary and St Joseph from Jerusalem to Nazareth. The lavish interior fittings can be seen in the church treasury.

The site is accessible to visitors. Viewing of the building is only possible by prior arrangement. More information about the parish and the Holy Mass schedule can be found on the website of the Kalisz diocese: www.diecezja.kalisz.pl.

compiled by Teresa Palacz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Poznan, 15-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Anders P., Województwo kaliskie, szkic monograficzny, Poznań 1983.
  • Rocznik Diecezji Kaliskiej - 2002, Kalisz 2002.
  • Łęcki Wł., Wielkopolska - słownik krajoznawczy, Poznań 2002.
  • Barokowe kościoły Wielkopolski, red. Maluśkiewicz P., Poznań 2006.
  • Katalog Zabytków Sztuki w Polsce, Ruszczyńska T., Sławska A. (red.), t. 5, z. 6 pow. kaliski, s. 12-19, Warszawa 1960.
  • Kolegiata kaliska na przestrzeni wieków 1303-2003, materiały pokonferencyjne, Kucharki G., ks. Plota J. (red.), Kalisz 2004.
  • Tomala J., Miasto lokacyjne w XIII-XVIII wieku, Kalisz 2004.

transport time to the next site

1 min

The Orthodox Tserkva of St Peter and Paul
Kalisz

15 minuts

The orthodox tserkva of St Peter and Paul in Kalisz, built in the Romanesque Revival style, bears testimony to the multicultural history of the city and to the presence of an Orthodox Christian community there. The tserkva still serves its original purpose and remains the centre of the parish. The interior features an iconostasis and other fixtures and fittings which were moved there from an earlier tserkva. Like its predecessor, the temple was named after St Peter and Paul Apostles. Along with the Greek Orthodox cemetery near the Wrocław Toll Gate and the army cemetery in the Majków district, the tserkva of St Peter and Paul Apostles on Niecała street remains one of the most significant buildings linked to the Orthodox community in Kalisz.

History

The plans for the construction of the tservka were originally approved in November 1928.

The cornerstone for the new temple was embedded on April 7, 1929. The building was designed by Michał Zenowicz.

The construction of the tserkva took place in years 1929-1930, under the direction of engineer Albert Nestrypke. The building materials for the construction of the new tserkva were obtained from the site of an older Orthodox church built back in years 1875-77, which stood by what is now known as the Pope John Paul II Square and which was subsequently demolished.

Renovation works were carried out in the 1990s.

Description

Kalisz is the oldest city in Poland, mentioned in the works of Claudius Ptolemy written in the second half of the 2nd century, located at the eastern edge of the Kalisz Upland, by the Prosna river. The first traces of human habitation here date back to the 8th century B.C., with the first fortified settlement in Zawodzie having been built back in the 10th century. The famous amber trial led through the city of Kalisz. The new city of Kalisz was founded on its current site by duke Bolesław the Pious around the year 1257. The city was founded at the junction of crucial trading routes and has always been the second-most significant city in Greater Poland, with only Poznań surpassing it in terms of both importance and size. After 1793, the city was incorporated into the Prussian Partition, while in 1815 it found itself within the Russian territory, serving as the centre of the governorate. Until the mid-1860s, the number of Orthodox Christians in Kalisz remained low. From the mid-18th century, refugees from the Balkans - referred to as “Greeks” back then - have started to arrive in Kalisz. It was them who laid the foundations of the Orthodox community in the city. Later on, as the city was incorporated into the Congress Kingdom of Poland and became the capital of the governorate, the number of Orthodox Christians grew due to the fact that the members of the Russian civilian and military administration were all faithful to the Orthodox Church. Shortly before the onset of World War I, the Orthodox community accounted for approximately 7-9% of the permanent population. The vast majority of the members of this community were Russians.

The first Orthodox church in Kalisz was founded somewhere around the years 1818-1825 on Stanisława street, at the building formerly used as a convent of the Order of St Clare. It was known as the church of St Athanasius . The Russian garrison in Kalisz also had its own tserkva (the Tserkva of St George) from 1832 onwards, even though it was later closed when World War I was over and then the Russian soldiers left the country. In years 1875-77, a monumental tserkva incorporating numerous traits of Byzantine architecture was erected by the city square known as the Pope John Paul II Square today. The fate of the Tserkva of St Peter and Paul Apostles was sealed in 1919 when the decision was taken to dismantle the building. The demolition works were only completed in 1930; one of the crosses which had once adorned this church now stands atop the obelisk commemorating the “Millenary of the Baptism of Ruthenia, 988 - 1988”, located in the Army Cemetery in the Majkowo district.

After 1920, the interned Ukrainian soldiers serving under the ataman (a title traditionally used by Cossack chieftains) Symon Petliura arrived in Kalisz. The two internment camps existed there until 1924. It was on the site of these camps that new Orthodox churches were built - even after the camps themselves were liquidated. Even then, however, the needs of the local Orthodox community could not be accommodated without the construction of a new tserkva, the plans for which were approved in 1928. The church was finally opened in September 1930.

The tserkva is situated on the northern edge of the city park, on Niecała street; it follows a single-nave layout with a pseudo-transept and a narrower chancel with a semi-hexagonal termination. The nave features a four-sloped tented roof with a steeple at the top. The tower is topped with an octagonal tented roof crowned with a bulbous cupola with a globe surmounted by a crucifix at the top. The façades of the church are covered with plaster; the façades of the corps de logis of the building are partitioned horizontally by a stepped section of the plinth, the arcaded frieze and the crowning cornice. The two-storey façade follows a three-axis design and features an avant-corps in the lower section which incorporates the entrance door framed by an archivolt adorned with foliage and geometric ornaments. The façade, flanked by a pair of lower side extensions with blind windows, is topped with an octagonal tower. The main decorative features of the façades of both the chancel and the side extensions are the pronounced plinth, window openings and crowning cornice.

The interior consists of a nave preceded by a porch and narthex. The porch houses the stairs leading up to the choir gallery which opens up into the nave with a semi-circular arch. The interior is adorned by a wall painting incorporating Greek crosses, foliate scrollwork as well as ornamentation combining foliage and geometric elements. Depictions of the Four Evangelists are incorporated into the areas around the arches of the nave, from the direction of the chancel. The ceiling features a plafond with an image of Christ Pantocrator and a painting of the Holy Ghost in the radiant glory of winged Seraphim heads. The tserkva houses an iconostasis dating back to the fourth quarter of the 19th century, incorporating the icons of the Virgin Mary, Christ Pantocrator, St Michael and St Peter and Paul. The icon of the Virgin Mary miraculously avoided destruction during World War II, when a stray bullet penetrated the glass casing without damaging the painting itself.

The historic monument can be visited upon prior arrangement. The parish in Kalisz is one of the four parishes of the Łódź decanate - the Łódź-Poznań diocese of the Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church.

compiled by Teresa Palacz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Poznan, 16-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Anders P., Województwo kaliskie, szkic monograficzny, Poznań 1983.
  • Łęcki Wł., Wielkopolska - słownik krajoznawczy, Poznań 2002.
  • Kościelniak W., Kronika miasta Kalisza, Kalisz 1989.
  • Dzieje Kalisza, Rusiński Władysław (red), Poznań 1977.
  • Dziubek A., Cmentarz majkowski w Kaliszu, [w:] Rocznik Kaliski, t. XXXV, s. 103-124, Kalisz 2009.
  • Małyszko S., Zabytkowe cmentarze przy rogatce w Kaliszu, Kalisz 2003.

transport time to the next site

9 min

7 min

Cmentarz prawosławny przy Rogatce
Kalisz

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

3 min

2 min

Cmentarz ewangelicki przy Rogatce
Kalisz

30 minutes

transport time to the next site

1 min

2 min

Roman Catholic cemetery
Kalisz

one hour

The Roman Catholic cemetery, founded in 1807 and extended in 1841, positioned alongside the Augsburg Evangelical cemetery and near the Greek Catholic necropolis located across the street, bears testimony to the multicultural history of the city of Kalisz. All three cemeteries are located near the Wrocław Toll Gate, erected back in 1821. The Roman Catholic cemetery flows seamlessly into the Lutheran cemetery, with members of the same families, albeit of different confession, having been buried alongside one another. Initially located beyond the city limits, the cemetery serves as the municipal necropolis; before it was founded, the dead would be interred near churches, while the founders thereof tended to be buried inside the churches themselves.

History

In 1787, the burials in churchyards located in the chartered city finally ceased.

Works aimed at the foundation of a Catholic cemetery beyond the city limits were carried out in years 1803-1807.

In 1808, a brick wall was built around the cemetery by a man named Bernstein, a master of the masons’ guild. A gate was also erected at the time, although the appearance of this now-vanished structure remains unknown.

From 1827 onwards, the first monuments have started to appear in the graveyard.

In 1840, a morgue was erected near the cemetery, incorporating an apartment for the undertaker and the cemetery watchman; a new gate, designed in the Classicist style, was also built at that time.

In 1841, the cemetery was extended towards the west, with new burial plots and paths being designated.

In years 1871-1877, a brick wall replaced the former wooden fence in the western section of the cemetery.

In years 1913-1977, the cemetery remained closed; due to overcrowding of the graveyard, the only burials permitted during that period were those in family tombs as well as tombs made of brick.

During World War II the cemetery was ransacked, with all of the iron fences around the graves as well as other metal detailing being lost.

During the second half of the 20th century, simple tombs made of terrazzo were constructed in lieu of earthen graves.

The most valuable headstones and monuments in the cemetery were renovated after 1990.

Description

Kalisz is the oldest city in Poland, mentioned in the works of Claudius Ptolemy written in the second half of the 2nd century, located at the eastern edge of the Kalisz Upland, by the Prosna river. The first traces of human habitation here date back to the 8th century B.C., with the first fortified settlement in Zawodzie having been built back in the 10th century. The famous amber trial led through the city of Kalisz. The new city of Kalisz was founded on its current site by duke Bolesław the Pious around the year 1257. The city was founded at the junction of crucial trading routes and has always been the second-most significant city in Greater Poland, with only Poznań surpassing it in terms of both importance and size.

Initially, the dead would be buried in churchyard cemeteries within the limits of the chartered city as well as in the Zawodzie district and around the churches in the neighbouring villages. The development of the city as well as public health considerations necessitated the establishment of a municipal cemetery that would be located beyond the city limits.

The new cemetery was established on the land forming part of the Dobrzec Mały village, bordering on the Evangelical cemetery from the north-east and framed by the slopes of the nearby hill - commonly referred to as “terraces”, from the north-west and the south-east. The cemetery occupied a quadrangular area approximating the shape of a square, with the entrance and the main gate accessible from the nearby road towards Wrocław, known today as Górnośląska street. The cemetery site was divided into four asymmetrical burial plots, each of a different size. The paths between the individual burial plots have been arranged in a Latin cross layout, at a slight angle vis-a-vis the borders of the cemetery. This layout of both the paths and the burial plots resulted from the shape of the terrain.

During the initial period of existence of the cemetery, apart from the deceased from various parishes in Kalisz, a group of soldiers of Napoleon’s army (participants of the march towards Moscow) were buried here in 1813; before their deaths, these soldiers received treatment at an infirmary in the monastery of the Observant friars. In the first years of the graveyard’s existence, those who died a suicidal death would be buried beyond the walls of the cemetery. From 1831 onwards, however, they were interred at the choleric cemetery in Tyniec, along with deceased inmates of the city prison. In the 1820s and the 1830s, most sepulchres were earthen graves with simple wooden crosses; sometimes, epitaph plaques would also be placed on the cemetery wall. In the south-eastern corner of the cemetery stands the oldest of all surviving monuments, bearing a plaque from 1827; this pyramid-shaped tomb is the final resting place of Stanisław Broszkowski, a major in the Polish armed forces.

The surface area of the Roman Catholic cemetery is 1.8530 hectares. Despite its regular shape and layout of the paths, one may easily get lost among the maze of gravestones. The cemetery was designed on polygonal plan the shape of which approximates that of a triangle, divided into four quadrangular burial plots with two longitudinal alleys, with the main alley, slightly arched in shape, being positioned at the east-west axis; these alleys are supplemented by a number of transverse paths. The cemetery also features a diverse collection of old trees - elms (which are about 120 years old by now), lindens, chestnuts, maples and cedars. The main gate, designed in the Classicist style, can be found in the eastern part of the cemetery and is accessible from Górnośląska street. The former undertaker’s house, also designed in the Classicist style, can be found near the western gate. The cemetery wall is adorned with numerous epitaph plaques dating back to the second half of the 19th century; these are preceded by later tombs from the late 19th century and the early 20th century, positioned alongside the wall; most of these tombs exhibit eclectic or Neoclassical forms. The main alley is lined with sepulchral chapels. The cemetery serves as the final resting place of the most eminent Catholic citizens of the city of Kalisz who lived here in the 19th and 20th centuries. Protestant citizens, on the other hand, were buried on the Augsburg Evangelical cemetery located right next to the Catholic one.

The site is accessible to visitors during the opening hours of the cemetery. The cemetery remains the property of the St Nicholas parish in Kalisz. The parish office is located at 5 Kanonicka street (phone number: 62 7573919).

compiled by Teresa Palacz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Poznan, 17-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Anders P., Województwo kaliskie, szkic monograficzny, Poznań 1983.
  • Łęcki Wł., Wielkopolska - słownik krajoznawczy, Poznań 2002.
  • Kościelniak W., Kronika miasta Kalisza, Kalisz 1989.
  • Dzieje Kalisza, Rusiński Władysław (red), Poznań 1977.
  • Dziubek A., Cmentarz majkowski w Kaliszu, [w:] Rocznik Kaliski, t. XXXV, s. 103-124, Kalisz 2009.
  • Małyszko S., Zabytkowe cmentarze przy rogatce w Kaliszu, Kalisz 2003.

transport time to the next site

9 min

6 min

Cmentarz żydowski
Kalisz

one hour

transport time to the next site

9 min

8 min

Most kamienny na rzece Prośnie
Kalisz

15 minuts

transport time to the next site

3 min

3 min

The Wojciech Bogusławski municipal theatre
Kalisz

30 minutes

The Wojciech Bogusławski municipal theatre in Kalisz, erected in years 1920-1936 to the design of Czesław Przybylski, is one of the most picturesquely located theatres in Poland, its harmonious form reflecting in the waters of the Prosna river. Its interiors are distinguished by their exceptional simplicity and elegance, much like other theatre buildings designed by the same architect. From 1961 onwards, the Kalisz theatre serves as the venue for the Kalisz Theatre Meetings, the oldest drama festival in Poland. Many eminent actors have performed on the stage of the Kalisz theatre.

History

The history of theatre in Kalisz goes all the way back to the 16th century, when a students’ theatre operated alongside the local Jesuit college.

In 1800, Wojciech Bogusławski and his theatre troupe arrived in Kalisz for the first time, having just completed a successful series of performances in Poznań.

In 1801, the first theatre building was erected at Bogusławski’s initiative. Based on a timber frame, this theatre was designed for an audience of 500. It existed there until 1817.

The second theatre building in Kalisz stood on the axis of the Józefina Alley (currently known as the Freedom Alley) in years 1829-1858. It was also a wooden structure; in 1858, it was lost to the blaze. For nearly 40 years the city did not have a theatre of its own.

Finally, a new building, designed by Józef Chrzanowski in the Renaissance Revival style, was erected in 1890 and existed there until 1914. Lamentably, this building was then set on fire by the German forces on 16.08.1914 and was completely destroyed.

The existing Neoclassical building was constructed in years 1920-1936, based on the design created by Czesław Przybylski in years 1914-1923; a representative of the Modernist movement, his other well-known designs include the Polish Theatre in Warsaw, a theatre in Vilnius and the so-called “rounded house” on Krakowskie Przedmieście street in Warsaw.

Description

Kalisz is the oldest city in Poland, mentioned in the works of Claudius Ptolemy written in the second half of the 2nd century, located at the eastern edge of the Kalisz Upland, by the Prosna river. The first traces of human habitation here date back to the 8th century B.C., with the first fortified settlement in Zawodzie having been built back in the 10th century. The famous amber trial led through the city of Kalisz. The new city of Kalisz was founded on its current site by duke Bolesław the Pious around the year 1257. The city was founded at the junction of crucial trading routes and has always been the second-most significant city in Greater Poland, with only Poznań surpassing it in terms of both importance and size. It was here, for example, that Casimir the Great signed the “everlasting” peace treaty with the Teutonic Order. After 1793, the city was incorporated into the Prussian Partition, while in 1815 it found itself within the Russian territory.

The theatre on Bogusławski square is the fourth theatre building which was erected here over the 200 years of history of theatre in Kalisz. The Bogusławski square grew out of the final section of the Freedom Avenue (Al. Wolności), the history of which dates back to the year 1800. The theatre building, designed in the Neoclassical style, remains one of the main architectural features of the square. Built back in the 1930s, the building occupies the same spot as the two structures which preceded it and may therefore be considered to be an extension of the genius loci. It was named after Wojciech Bogusławski, since it is with him that the history of theatre in Kalisz has originally begun. The central entrance to the City Park, leading through the Theatre Bridge, is located right next to the building. The history of the park itself can be traced back to 1798. The Bogusławski Square is also the site of the National Bank of Poland building erected in years 1924-1926 based on the design by Marian Lalewicz and featuring some rather interesting architectural forms. Along with Freedom Avenue, the Bogusławski Square remains one of the most picturesque parts of the city of Kalisz.

The theatre itself is a brick building designed on a rectangular floor plan, featuring two side avant-corps positioned alongside the stage, with the one overlooking the Prosna river being preceded by a portico with two pairs of columns. The other avant-corps is adorned with decorative pilasters. The front façade is adorned by a semi-circular Ionic portico with four pairs of pillars. The rear façade also features an avant-corps with an arched window and a doorway, positioned on the axis of the entrance door. All façades are covered with plaster and adorned with Classicist architectural and ornamental detailing. Cornices and parapet walls with balustrades at the top of each façade provide a finishing touch. The windows, rectangular in shape, are embellished with decorative surrounds. The interior features a symmetrical layout and consists of the auditorium with an amphitheatrical layout, featuring three pairs of galleries and two balconies, connected to the vestibule by means of symmetrically arranged, independent staircases. The stage itself follows the proscenium layout. The body of the three-storey building is complex in shape, with an elevated middle section incorporating the stage. The roofs used for the individual sections of the building are either gable roofs or multi-hipped roofs, all clad with sheet metal.

With a tradition that can be traced all the way back to the year 1800, the Municipal Theatre in Kalisz went on to become a permanent fixture of the cultural landscape of the city and beyond. Its significance for the promotion of drama has a nationwide dimension. Two plaques have been embedded in the walls of the theatre building. One of them informs that on August 2, 1800, a troupe of actors led by Wojciech Bogusławski performed on this very spot (the plaque itself dates back to 1975); the second plaque commemorates the 200th anniversary of theatre in Kalisz and is intended to honour all actors who had the privilege to perform here. The Kalisz Theatre is a Cultural Institution of the Greater Poland Local Government.

The historic monument can be visited from the outside. Contact details: telephone - (62) 760 53 00 (02); e-mail: sekretariat@tear.kalisz.pl; website: http://teatr.kalisz.pl

compiled by Teresa Palacz, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Poznan, 20-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Anders P., Województwo kaliskie, szkic monograficzny, Poznań 1983.
  • Łęcki Wł., Wielkopolska - słownik krajoznawczy, Poznań 2002.
  • Jonkajtys-Luba G., Architektura i architekci świata współczesnego. Czesław Przybylski, Warszawa 1996.
  • Architekt Czesław Przybylski (1880-1936), [w:] Architektura i Budownictwo, Rok. XII Nr 8-9-10, Warszawa 1936.
  • Kaczmarek A., Dzieje kaliskich ulic, Kalisz 2002.
  • Dzieje Kalisza, Rusiński Wł. (red.), Poznań 1977.
  • Strona internetowa: Dawny Kalisz. www.info.pl

transport time to the next site

5 min

6 min

Zespół dawnej Fabryki Fortepianów i Pianin
Kalisz

15 minuts

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