Spacer z przeszłością po Gdyni
Narodowy Instytut Dziedzictwa pl

users tour Magdalena Brożyna

Spacer z przeszłością po Gdyni

25

one day

pomorskie

Dworzec Główny
Gdynia

15 minuts

Former White-Collar Employees’ Insurance Institution
Gdynia

15 minuts

It is one of the symbols of modernist architecture in Gdynia. The building was designed in the style of expressive functionalism.

History

Designed by Roman Piotrowski, architect from Warsaw, in 1934, the office and service building of the White-Collar Employees’ Insurance Institution in Poznań (later ZUS — Social Insurance Institution) was built in 1935-1936. Since 1951, the building was used as the head office of the Polish Ocean Lines. The ground floor housed shops and “Cafe Bałtyk” which was one of the most famous cafés of that period in Gdynia.

Description

The prestigious investment project of the insurance institution was located in corner of the quarter of the new urban tissue in the immediate vicinity of a railway station, near the main artery of the city leading to Kościuszko Square and Southern Pier. It is one of the most distinctive modernist buildings in Gdynia.. Due to the scale of the buildings and arrangement of the bodies of different heights and the exposed rounded part, the structure is associated with a ship, which is characteristic of modernist architecture in Gdynia. The building was exposed in the corner plot and is the dominant feature among the building of both streets. The cylindrical corner was incorporated in the corner of the intersection of 10-ego Lutego Street with 3-go Maja Street. The L-shaped building consists of two dynamically juxtaposed bodies: higher one having the shape of a standing cuboid and rectangle and lower elongated part terminating in a cylindrical corner projecting towards the front beyond the line of the buildings from the side of 3-go Maja Street. The lower part of the building has five storeys, and the taller part — seven storeys. The composition is also complemented by a cylindrically terminated part of the building added to the taller rectangular body from the side of 3-go Maja Street. Wide strips of glass windows extending longitudinally in an alternating pattern with smooth bright façade evoke admiration. The ground floor was covered with slabs of black granite, whereas the upper storeys were covered with slabs of light sandstone, which visually separated the building from the artery along which it is situated. The build was designed and formally linked with the neighbouring residential building (in 22/24 3-go Maja Street).

The structure is open to visitors all year round. Viewing of the building is possible during opening hours on working days.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 30-06-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Na styku dwóch epok. Architektura gdyńskich kamienic okresu międzywojennego, Gdynia 2003, s. 329-333;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Modernistyczna Gdynia - dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych, [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.60-73;
  • http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architektura_Gdyni
  • http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budynek_biurowy_ZUS_w_Gdyni

Residential house, State Development Bank of Poland
Gdynia

30 minutes

The excellent location in the urban tissue and the original shape of the body and architectural detail make the building prominent. The building exhibits features characteristic of the thirties, combining the late functionalist structural paintings with a high standard of apartments and exclusive interior design, which is also evident in the staircases and corridors. It is the first apartment building in Poland.

History

The building was the property of the State Development Bank (Bank Gospodarstwa Krajowego).. It was designed in 1935, and built in three stages in 1936-1938. The design was created by Stanisław Ziołowski from Warsaw, Eng. of Architecture. The structure consists of three parts; each stage of construction ended with the commissioning of another part of the building. The first part commissioned part was located in the corner of 10 Lutego Street, no. 2702.09.1936, as the dominant structure in terms of overall dimensions and spatial layout. Two other similar parts were erected at the later stages.

Description

The building is located in the city centre, in the southern frontage of 10 Lutego Street. The building occupies the entire eastern frontage of 3 Maja Street in the quarter closed off by 10 Lutego Street and Batorego Street. The building was erected on a corner plot in one of the most prestigious streets in Gdynia. The structure characterised by its significant size was built on a C-shaped floor plan; its longer side extends along 3 Maja Street. The building has two entrance gates to the yard and an entrance to the underground garage from Batorego Street. The structure in enveloped by means of pillars and filled with a two- and three-bay layout with staircases. The area of the plot no. 27 facing the yard was used for a two-storey lodge built on a quadrilateral plan. The entrances to six staircases were placed from the side of the yard; each staircase is fitted with a lift. The part of the ground floor overlooking the street houses shops and cafés. The building varies in height (from 5 to 9 storeys) and is fragmented. The corners are accentuated by two staggered and recessed top storeys and the curvature of the floor plan of the building by means of a semicircular tower overlooking the intersection of 10 Lutego Street and 3 Maja Street. The centre of the yard features a reinforced concrete skylight providing illumination for the underground garage on the model of a Greek temple or a gazebo on a circular plan. Basements extend under the entire structure. The building contains a bunker. It is a reinforced post-and-beam structure. Its exterior walls are made of brick and reinforced concrete, and the interior walls of brick. The basements are covered with reinforced concrete and ribbed ceilings; Ackerman floors were installed between the storeys. The garage is covered with arched vaulting and reinforced concrete and ribbed ceilings. The roof rests on a wooden and purlin roof truss with a slight slope. The building is covered with a mono- and two-pitched roof. The façades facing the streets feature horizontal partitions by means of windows separated by loggias and windows in a row. The ground floor is glazed. The façade is faced with limestone extracted in Pińczów in the form of rectangular plates. The façades overlooking the yard are vertically partitioned by rows of window openings providing additional illumination for staircases, rows of balconies and windows. The area around the gates and passages is covered with concrete floors, whereas the main entrance (no. 27) with terracotta tiles. The interiors of the entrances and staircases features floors hammered terrazzo; the apartments are covered with wooden floors — oak parquet planks, kitchens and bathrooms — terracotta tiles. The marble wall covering of the staircases, wooden dados, and window and door joinery have been preserved in good condition. The building houses a mini-museum founded by the inhabitants of the building and Cyganeria Cafe, artistic café designed in the Art Déco style.

The structure can be viewed from the outside. The commercial part of the ground floor is open to visitors.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 08-05-2015.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M.J., Studium architektoniczno-urbanistycznej waloryzacji Gdyni do roku 1939 w granicach administracyjnych miasta z roku 1970, cz.II, osadnictwo przedmiejskie i miasto, t.2. waloryzacja Śródmieścia; Gdańsk, 1986;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Na styku dwóch epok. Architektura gdyńskich kamienic okresu międzywojennego, Gdynia 2003, s. 329-333;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Modernistyczna Gdynia - dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych, [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.60-73;
  • Karta ewidencyjna, Budynek mieszkalny, Jacek Lewiński, 1983 r.
  • http://modernizmgdyni.pl/?p=259

kościół parafialny pw. Najświętszego Serca Pana Jezusa
Gdynia

15 minuts

kamienica
Gdynia

15 minuts

kościół parafialny pw. Najświętszej Marii Panny Królowej Polski
Gdynia

15 minuts

Multi-Family House
Gdynia

15 minuts

The building is characterised by the original modernist architecture of the thirties and modern reinforced concrete structure with brick infills. The simple body features distinctive narrow vertical lesenes and wave-shaped balconies overlooking Żwirki i Wigury Street.

History

The building was built for Zakłady przemysłowe M. Krenski (industrial company). It was designed by Z. Kupiec and T. Kossak, architects from Gdańsk. The construction work was led by Zbigniew Kupiec, who cooperated with Jan Czajka, master-mason and carpenter. The finishing works on the building were interrupted by World War 2 and were completed only after 1945 (plastering of the façades, finishing of the ground floor, and installation of lifts).

Description

The building is situated in a prominent corner among the densely built-up area of the frontages of two main streets of Gdynia: Świętojańska Street (west façade) and Żwirki and Wigury Street (south façade). The tenement was erected on a rectangular floor plan and features a gateway on the ground floor level. The structure combines moderate modernism with late functionalism. It consists of three elements: six-storey main core at the corner and two five-storey side wings. The corner part of the building which is higher by one storey accentuates the quarter, and the lower side fragments connect the building to the neighbouring structures. A glazed staircase faces the yard. The façades of the corner part are designed in an analogical way. Both have four axes, with individual axes separated from each other with narrow lines of piers between the windows overlapping vertically on the horizontal strip-like arrangement of windows. The connector between the body and the wing facing Żwirki i Wigury Street features “waving” balconies full of movement and chiaroscuro, which further on pass into windows arranged in a ribbon-like pattern. The ground floor is a commercial space and was deliberately glazed so as to expose the post-and-beam structure. The building had a central heating, gas, and water and sewerage system. Originally, it was to be entirely encased in slabs of sandstone extracted in Szydłowiec but, unfortunately, due to the outbreak of the war, the unfinished works were never resumed, and after the war part of the sandstone coverings were removed and replaced with ordinary plaster. The apartments were fitted with luxurious furnishings. The first and second storeys contained apartments with a floor area of 200 m2. In addition to well-appointed bathrooms (e.g., bidet), the apartments were fitted with oak parquet, terracotta; the walls of the kitchens and bathrooms were covered with tiling. It was the first building in Gdynia to have composite (or Swedish) window joinery as early as before the war. Composite windows are double-framed windows, in which the two frames are connected by special screws or clamps and open to the inside.

The structure can be viewed from the outside. The commercial ground floor is open to the public.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 01-06-2015.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M., Modernistyczna Gdynia-dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.61-73
  • Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytków, Dom mieszkalny wielorodzinny, Gdynia, ul. Świętojańska 55, T. Kiernicki, M. WIelebski1982;
  • http://pomorskie.travel/Odkrywaj-Dziedzictwo_kulturowe-Zabytki_architektury-Domy_i_Kamienice/4801/Kamienica_firmy_Krenski
  • http://www.gdynia.pl/wszystko/o/gdyni/historia/5637_37.html

Dom mieszkalny wielorodzinny
Gdynia

15 minuts

willa
Gdynia

15 minuts

willa Sokola
Gdynia

15 minuts

willa Sadyba
Gdynia

15 minuts

Polskarob Office Building
Gdynia

15 minuts

The office building is a remarkable example of functionalist modern architecture of the thirties, with striking naval motifs. It is located, unusually, in a residential district, but is harmoniously incorporated into the landscape. The structure is stylistically uniform and features a complex design: office building, garages, and garden with structural landscaping items.

History

The building was built in 1934/35 as the seat of a transport company (Polsko-Skandynawskie Towarzystwo Transportowe Polskarob). It was designed by S. Płoski and K. Krzyżanowski, architects from Gdańsk. The construction work was entrusted Inż. K. Krzyżanowski i S-ka, construction company. The area around the building was developed into a modernist garden, part of which has been well-preserved to this day (designer: Barbara Kaszycka). In 1939, a bunker was built according to a design by Major R. Fryszkowski (Head of the Seacoast Fortifications). During the war, the building was used at the seat of the Gestapo. After the war, the building was taken over by the Navy. A common room (cubature: 290 m3) was added in the south-western part, along the line of the original garages in 1960, with the character of the older part of the building being preserved. The design was created by R. Kolendo, Eng. of Architecture. In 1975, an antenna mast for the Civil Militia Provincial Headquarters (KW MO) was mounted on the roof.

Description

The structure is located in a residential area in Gdynia, on the south-eastern slope of Kamienna Góra (the Stone Mountain), on the southern side of Korzeniowskiego Street. The building is a free-standing structure located on a large plot enclosed by a fence. The garden with a pond and walking paths were designed together with the building. The building has an L-shaped floor plan. It consists of three storeys, basement, and its roof is clad with a roofing felt. It is composed of two intertwining parts: two-storey south-eastern part and three-storey south-western part. The main entrance to the building is located at the junction of these two parts. It is additionally highlighted by vertical arrangement of window openings of the staircase and the curvature of the corner, which is characteristic of modernist architecture in Gdańsk: the rounded corner was originally covered with clinker bricks, not it is plastered (formerly dark brown), and the glass top floor extension protruding like a periscope, and in the entrance arcade — a round window which imitates a ship's bull's-eye. The wings of the building feature a horizontal layout of windows; in the soutern corner of the south-eastern wing is a semicircular glazed veranda with access to the garden. Garages are located on the western side. A mast measuring 15.4 was installed on the roof over the staircase. The mast rests on the walls of the staircase.

The structure can be viewed from the outside.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 28-08-2015.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M., Modernistyczna Gdynia-dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.61-73
  • Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Karta ewidencyjna zabytków, Budynek administracyjny wojskowy, Gdynia, ul. Korzeniowskiego 8/10, T. Kiernicki, M. Wielebski, 1982;
  • http://www.bryla.pl/bryla/51,85298,6993010.html?i=8
  • http://pomorskie.travel/Odkrywaj-Dziedzictwo_kulturowe-Zabytki_architektury-Budynki_uzytecznosci_publicznej/4790/Budynek_mieszkalno_biurowy_firmy_POLSKAROB
  • http://modernizmgdyni.pl/?p=391

willa Zośieńka
Gdynia

15 minuts

willa Poznanianka
Gdynia

15 minuts

d. hotel Polska Riviera, ob. Klub Marynarki Wojennej
Gdynia

15 minuts

Dom Żeglarza Polskiego, ob. Uniwersytet Morski
Gdynia

15 minuts

Pręczkowski Family Tenement, currently a tenement house
Gdynia

15 minuts

It is the most prominent building of the 1920s in Gdynia. In terms of visual arts, the structure represents early functionalism. It was the first building to employ formal analogies to shipbuilding.

History

The tenement house was owned by engineer Stanisław Pręczkowski from Wejherowo. It was designed in 1928 and built in stages. The design was created by Tadeusz Jędrzejewski working for the architectural design studio “Biuro architektoniczne Włodzimierz Prochaska, Stanisław Garliński, Tadeusz Jędrzejewski. Inżynierowie architekci”. In 1930-1931, the construction work was carried out under the supervision of Bernard Dulny. During that period, the corner part of the building and a fragment overlooking the Kościuszko Square were erected. Between 1934 and 1935, a wing was added facing Kościuszko Square; the extension did not include a side outbuilding. The last stage of the construction work took place in 1936-1937. The stage involved the construction of a wing facing Żeromskiego Street and “Polonia” cinema.

Description

The building is located in the city centre, in the northern frontage of Kościuszko Square, at the intersection with Żeromskiego Street. The corner building is built on an L-shaped plan; its longer side extends along Kościuszko Square. The building and the cinema overlooking the yard have a rectangular floor plan with a diagonal eastern side. The imposing tenement house is located among typical urban frontage buildings. It has five floors at the corner and lower side wings. The layout is symmetrical; streamlined forms are combined with expressive shapes of the bodies; structural decorative components of the plastered façade were exposed. The pioneering juxtaposition of individual segments of the building clearly raises associations with a ship: the corner of the tenement which is higher by one storey was juxtaposed with the cylindrical form reminiscent of a captain’s bridge, which was additionally highlighted by metal balustrades of the balconies and a darker colour of the plaster. The ground floor was adapted for trade and services. The “Polonia” cinema overlooking the yard was added later (after the war — “Goplana” cinema). The building contains three staircases. It features a two-bay layout and is divided into small flats allowing the possibility of jointing the central flats into one large flat. The building has central heating. The preserved original furnishings include window and door joinery, interesting steel openwork balustrades of the balconies, and interior stair railings.

The structure can be viewed from the outside. The commercial part of the ground floor is open to visitors.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 08-11-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Na styku dwóch epok. Architektura gdyńskich kamienic okresu międzywojennego, Gdynia 2003, s. 329-333;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Modernistyczna Gdynia - dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych, [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.60-73;
  • http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamienica_Pręczkowskich
  • http://modernizmgdyni.pl/?p=288

dom
Gdynia

15 minuts

budynek Związku Młodzieży Chrześcijańskiej Polska YMCA
Gdynia

15 minuts

klasztor Zgromadzenia ss. Miłosierdzia św. Wincentego a Paulo
Gdynia

15 minuts

hotel Bristol, ob. Lark
Gdynia

15 minuts

dom
Gdynia

15 minuts

dom Antoniego Abrahama
Gdynia

15 minuts

Market Hall Complex (main hall and fish hall)
Gdynia

30 minutes

The innovative structural complex of commercial buildings in Gdynia was designed in the style of expressive funtionalism. The structure has retained the same function from its inception to the present day.

History

The Market Hall Complex in Gdynia was designed by famous architects Jerzy Mueller and Stefan Reychman and built in 1937. The design was successfully implemented by Zjednoczenie Hut - Królewskiej i Laury [Association of the Royal and Laura Steelworks], Zarząd Warsztatów Górnośląskich [Upper Silesian Workshop Authority], Towarzystwo Akcyjne Katowice [Katowice Auction Society].

Description

The complex is located in the city centre, in the quarter between Wójta Radtkego Street (former Migały Street) to the east, Jana z Kolna Street to the west, 3-go Maja Street to the north, and the plot of the court building (Konstytucji Square and Jan z Kolna Streee) to the south The main hall is asymmetrical and fragmented. The main body was extended by a wing on a floor plan approximating the shape of the letter “L”, which was added at a right angle.

The main hall is tall and features a distinctive parabolic cross-section. The structure is composed of nine huge trusses (spaced at 10 m; span: 35 m), whose layout is visible from the outside and from the inside. The structure is faced with bricks and plastered on the outside; in the lower sections the trusses are anchored using the system of walls forming the side rooms of the hall. The covering was installed on a metal framework and mostly glazed. Similarly, both shorter parabolic ends of the main body were glazed. The glass surfaces of these façades were partitioned by reinforced concrete pillars. The outermost truss is faced with brick and plastered, which gives the effect of a parabolic frame of the glazed front façade.

The side wing is low and was erected on a rectangular floor plan. It is a frame structure filled with thin walls at the bottom and a row of windows at the top.

The fish hall is small compared to the main hall, both in terms of its contour and cubature. It is located on the extension of the wing of the main hall towards the north-west. The hall is devoid of annexes, and in terms of the structure, it was designed similarly to the wing of the main hall (frame structure with masonry infills and window openings). Additionally, the market hall complex compositionally connects the motif of a 1.5-metre-tall plinth to the motif of clinker cladding (dark red) as well as the unloading ramps with door recesses from the side of 3 Maja Street, Jana z Kolna Street, and the market square. The original floors and window and door joinery have been preserved.

The monument is open to visitors.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 29-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Modernistyczna Gdynia - dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych, [w:] Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.60-73;
  • Małgorzata Omilanowska, Świątynie handlu, Warszawa, 2004 r.
  • Architektura i Budownictwo nr 4/5, s. 154-157, 1938 r.
  • Sołtysik M.J., Studium architektoniczno-urbanistyczne waloryzacji Gdyni do roku 1939 w granicach administracyjnych miasta z roku 1970 , część II., osadnictwo przedmiejskie i miasto, t.2. Waloryzacja Śródmieścia, Gdańsk, 1986; maszynopis w archiwum NID O.T. Gdańsk;
  • http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miejska_Hala_Targowa
  • http://www.haletargowegdynia.pl/architektura.html

District Court
Gdynia

30 minutes

It is a rare example of the so-called moderate functionalist architecture that was designed in conformity with the principle of structural visual arts and, at the same time, with subtle means of expression. The avant-garde form of the building was one of the symbols of modernity of Gdynia.

History

The District Court building was designed by architects Tadeusz Sieczkowski, Zbigniew Karpiński and Roman Sołtyński in 1934. The building was commissioned in May 1936. The construction work was supervised by architect Stanisław Miecznikowski.

During World War 2 and the German occupation, the building housed a German district court (Amtsgericht). During the fighting in Gdynia in March 1945, the building was on fire three times. The first postwar hearing in the Regional Court took place on 28 May 1945, and in the Municipal Court on 11 September 1945. The County Court in Gdynia was established on 1 January 1951, and since 1 January 1971 the building has housed the District Court in Gdynia.

Description

The court building occupies the entire north-eastern frontage of the square at the PKP’s station in the centre of Gdynia. The cubature and exposure make the building the dominant feature in this part of the city. The District Court is a five-storey building with a tall ground floor. The building was erected on a floor plan in the shape of a circular segment (smooth curve) with a rectangular northern wing. It consists of a protruding cuboid incorporating the main entrance with a spectacular hallway and two symmetrical curved wings terminating in projecting cuboids which are lower by one storey. The right (southern) wing was used for residential purposes, and the left (western) one as offices. Additionally, another wing having a simple structure in the shape of a rectangle and adapted for use as offices was added asymmetrically on the northern side, behind one of the existing wings (western part), along Jana z Kolna Street. The entrance avant-corps was emphasised by the face made of sandstone extracted in Szydłowiec and glazing: three rows of tall windows were partitioned by four stone piers extending over the whole height of the front façade.

The preserved original interior furnishings include: stone floors, stairs with railings and balustrades, wooden floors, cast-iron radiators in the courtrooms, and numerous fittings such as wooden benches in the hallways and next to the courtrooms, lighting, and door joinery inside the building.

The structure can be visited during the office hours of the court. The design of the building also provided for housing for members of the judiciary. The flats were located in the southern part of the building. This part of the monument is not open to visitors.

compiled by Dorota Hryszkiewicz-Kahlau, Regional Branch of the National Heritage Board of Poland in Gdańsk, 08-10-2014.

Bibliography

  • Eligiusz Józef Sitek, 70 lat gdyńskiej Temidy, 1928-1998, Rocznik Gdyński nr 14, TMG 1999
  • Encyklopedia Gdyni, Oficyna Verdi Causa, Gdynia 2006
  • Kazimierz Małkowski, Bedeker Gdyński, Wydawnictwo OSKAR, Gdańsk 2001
  • Sławomir Kitowski, Gdynia. Miasto z morza i marzeń, Wyd. ALTER EGO, Sławomir Kitowski Gdynia 2006 Sołtysik M.J., Gdynia miasto dwudziestolecia międzywojennego, urbanistyka i architektura, Warszawa 1993;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Na styku dwóch epok. Architektura gdyńskich kamienic okresu międzywojennego, Gdynia 2003, s. 329-333;
  • Sołtysik M.J., Modernistyczna Gdynia - dziedzictwo lat międzywojennych, [w:] Alojzy Pieczyński, Wspomnienia sędziego grodzkiego, Rocznik Gdyński nr 8, TMG 1987/88
  • Renowacje i zabytki 2010, nr 4 (36), s.60-73;
  • http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architektura_Gdyni
  • http://modernizmgdyni.pl/?p=409
  • http://www.naszagdynia.com/gmach-sadu

Print this tour

This is user generated tour. Report terms violation.

Sites from that tour

zgłoś naruszenie